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Problem

When I pass the value to an int variable where the value exceed the maximum value for int, the value of the int variable become 0.

Background

I use the following steps to retrieve my data. I do not use any try-catch block without throwing an exception.

Step 1

In my WCF Service, I retrieve a DataTable using IBM.Data.DB2.iSeries.iDB2DataAdapter.Fill(DataSet)

Step 2

Then I convert the DataTable to List<T> using the code :

public static List<T> DataTableToList<T>(DataTable dt)
{
    List<T> tableEntity = new List<T>();

    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
    {
        T rowEntity = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();

        rowEntity.GetType().GetProperties().Where(o => dt.Columns.OfType<DataColumn>()
            .Select(p => p.ColumnName).Contains(o.Name)).ToList()
            .ForEach(o => o.SetValue(rowEntity, row[o.Name], null));

        tableEntity.Add(rowEntity);
    }

    return tableEntity;
}

with the type :

public class Client
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Step 3

I return it using the WCF service method :

[OperationContract]
public string GetClients()
{
    List<Client> clients = new DB().RetrieveClients();
    return Tools.SerializeObjectToXML<List<Client>>(clients);
}

with the helper method for serializing :

public static string SerializeObjectToXML<T>(T item)
{
    XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    using (StringWriter writer = new StringWriter())
    {
        xs.Serialize(writer, item);
        return writer.ToString();
    }
}

Step 4

Then in the Client Application, I retrieve it from the Service Reference with the default binding of WSHttpBinding with the code :

List<Client> clients = Tools.DeserializeXMLToObject<List<Client>>(new SomeServiceClient().GetClients());

with the helper method for deserializing :

public static T DeserializeXMLToObject<T>(string xmlText)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(xmlText)) return default(T);
    XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream(new UnicodeEncoding().GetBytes(xmlText)))
    using (XmlTextReader xsText = new XmlTextReader(memoryStream))
    {
        xsText.Normalization = true;
        return (T)xs.Deserialize(xsText);
    }
}

Question

The msdn says that :

When you convert from a double or float value to an integral type, the value is truncated. If the resulting integral value is outside the range of the destination value, the result depends on the overflow checking context. In a checked context, an OverflowException is thrown, while in an unchecked context, the result is an unspecified value of the destination type.

  • Why do the value of Client.ID becomes 0 when the value from the database exceeds the maximum allowed for int?
  • Is it because it is an unchecked context? If it is, how would I know?

My code is in C#, framework 4, build in VS2010 Pro.

Please help, thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
There's a lot of code there, can you clarify where exactly this unexpected conversion is taking place and what the input and output is? In a question like this its always best to try to create a minimum test case. At the moment I can't easily use the above to recreate your problem which makes me much less inclined to help answer it. You've not even explained where it is going wrong (I assume you've debugged enough to know where the unexpected behaviour is happening). Also as a last comment if you know the database is passing large values why put them in a datatype where they don't fit? –  Chris Mar 15 '12 at 10:24
    
Also are you sure you aren't tuncating the value in the database code? Having looked at your code I assume the DataTableToList method is what is writing your ID but I'd expect this to fail if it was trying to write an Int64 or double into an Int32 field so are you sure that what is in the datatable definitely does exceed int.Max? –  Chris Mar 15 '12 at 10:41

4 Answers 4

There is something fishy going on here. SetValue doesn't do cast/conversions (not even from uint to int, just tested). You would be much better enlarging the ForEach code in a real foreach and debugging it.

For example:

foreach (var o in rowEntity.GetType().GetProperties().Where(o => dt.Columns.OfType<DataColumn>()
        .Select(p => p.ColumnName).Contains(o.Name)))
{
    if (o.Name == "ID")
    {
        // Put a breakpoint here
    }

    o.SetValue(rowEntity, row[o.Name], null));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was lookign at that and suspecting that there is a stored procedure that is actually responsible for the truncation somewhere... –  Chris Mar 15 '12 at 10:42

By default, arithmetic overflow compiler switch is turned off in Visual Studio. To enable it:

  • Right-click on the project and click Properties.
  • Click on the Build tab.
  • Click on the Advanced… button.
  • Check the Check for arithmetic overflow/underflow checkbox.
share|improve this answer

Just a question: Why do you transmit the list as a string instead of doing the following:

[OperationContract]
public Client[] GetClients()
{
    List<Client> clients = new DB().RetrieveClients();
    return clients.ToArray();
}

and declare the Client class like:

[DataContract]
public class Client
{
    [DataMember]
    public int ID;

    [DataMember]
    public string Name;
}

Also: If the type of ID in the database allows for values larger than Int32.MaxValue, why would you use an Int32 at all and not an Int64?

As for overflow checking: I know that using Convert.ToInt32(Int64.MaxValue); throws an exception while int i = (int)Int64.MaxValue does not.

share|improve this answer

I do not know exactly where you can find if you are checked or unchecked. But it depends on your compilers options as stated in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/khy08726(v=vs.100).aspx

And as Thorsten Dittmar said, you can better use the DataContract to easily send the clients.

And if it overflows you can better use a long for the id instead of an int. That way it has way more positions (long == Int64). And if all of your Id's are > 0 you can use a unsigned int or unsigned long as your Id. Unsigned means that instead of also having numbers lower then zero it is only positive and therefor twice the positive positions.

share|improve this answer

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