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int main() { 
    std::deque<std::string> mydeque;
    std::back_insert_iterator<decltype(mydeque)> myback_insert_iterator(mydeque);
    std::ifstream myifstream("test.txt");
    while(std::getline(myifstream, *myback_insert_iterator)) {
    }
}

I simply want to read line-wise a text file into a string container. This produces compiler error:

C2784: could not deduce template argument for 'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &' from 'std::ifstream'

What's wrong?

share|improve this question
    
You should really prefer the std::back_inserter over declaring a back_insert_iterator<T> explicitly. –  pmr Mar 15 '12 at 11:25
    
Note that instead of using decltype in the declaration of the iterator, you can just use std::back_inserter(mydeque) - that is a function-template and will deduce the type for you. You can either pass that directly to your function, or declare the variable with auto, making your code much more readable. –  Björn Pollex Mar 15 '12 at 11:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try:

int main()
{
    std::deque<std::string> mydeque;
    std::ifstream myifstream("test.txt");

    std::string line;
    while(std::getline(myifstream, line)
    {
        mydeque.push_back(line);
    }
}

If it is one word per line you can simplify to:

int main()
{
    std::deque<std::string> mydeque;
    std::ifstream myifstream("test.txt");

    // Note: istream_iterator<T> uses std::istream& operator>>(std::istream&, T&) to
    //       read data from the stream. If `T` is a std::string this means it will
    //       read a single space separated word.

    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(myifstream),
              std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
              std::back_inserter(mydeque)
             );
}

If each line contains multiple words and you want to use the back inserter then you need to define a class for reading a whole line in an object that can be used with iterators:

struct Line
{
    std::string data;
    operator std::string const&() const {return data;}

    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& s, Line& dst)
    {
        return std::getline(s, dst.data);
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::deque<std::string> mydeque;
    std::ifstream myifstream("test.txt");

    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<Line>(myifstream),
              std::istream_iterator<Line>(),
              std::back_inserter(mydeque)
             );
}

Or we can just use the constructrs:

int main()
{
    std::ifstream myifstream("test.txt");
    std::deque<std::string> mydeque(std::istream_iterator<Line>(myifstream),
                                    (std::istream_iterator<Line>()));
    // Note: Extra brace required around second iterator here
    //       This is to avoid the problem with the `Most Vexing Parse`
    //       Which would otherwise make this a function declaration

}
share|improve this answer
    
That would probably work. Any idea, why the dereferenced insert_iterator behaves different than an assignable string object? Because *myback_insert_iterator = "abc"; actually works fine. –  Simon1X Mar 15 '12 at 11:37
    
@Simon1X: A back insert iterator is an output iterator. Technically you must use the ++ operator after each use of the assignment operator on the value (see note 3 in the Output Iterator page). Not incrementing after assignment is undefined behavior. It boils down to the output iterator does not have a value type thus operator * does not return a reference to std::string (the actual type is undefined). The iterator is defined in terms of the expected outputs in relation to the operators. –  Loki Astari Mar 15 '12 at 11:58
    
@simon1X C++ is a statically typed language. The compiler does not know about behavior, it knows the language constructs and types, and the iterator is not a string. getline takes a string as argument, and while the subset of operations that you need could be applied to that iterator (or many other types), the compiler will reject it on the ground that no matter how loud it quacks it is not a duck –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 15 '12 at 12:19

getline expects a string, not an output iterator. You can wrap myifstream into an input iterator and use std::copy. Like so:

#include <deque>
#include <fstream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

int main() {
    std::deque<std::string> mydeque;
    std::back_insert_iterator<decltype(mydeque)> myback_insert_iterator(mydeque);
    std::ifstream myifstream("test.txt");
    std::istream_iterator<std::string> i_it(myifstream), eos;
    std::copy(i_it, eos, myback_insert_iterator);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Which you could write in short as: std::deque<std::string> mydeque(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(myifstream), (std::istream_iterator<std::string>())); However, stopping on whitespaces instead of newline only. –  Simon1X Mar 15 '12 at 11:32

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