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I've recently started practising TDD and unit testing, with my main primers being the excellent GOOSGBT and a perusal of TDD-tagged questions here on SO.

Occasionally, the process I use creates a "controller" class - generally, a class which is a facade over a fairly complex subsystem where, as the number of features implemented in the subsystem grows, responsibilities are continually driven out into helper classes until the original class has essentially no responsibilities beyond making correct calls to a small set of collaborator classes and shunting the returned information (if any) to its other collaborator classes.

Originally, the tests for the soon-to-be controller classes were written at the level of intention of end-users of the class: "If I make this call, what should be the observable effects that I, as an end-user of the class, actually care about?". But as more and more responsibilities and tests for edge-cases were driven out into helper classes (which are replaced by Test Doubles in the tests for the controller class), these tests began to seem really ... vague and non-specific: they were invariably "happy-path" tests that didn't really seem to get to the heart of the matter. It's hard to explain what I mean, but reading the tests back left me with a kind of "So what? Why did you choose this particular happy-path test over any other? What is the significance? If someone breaks the code, will this test pinpoint the exact reason why the code is now broken?" As time went by, I was more and more strongly inclined to instead write the tests in terms of how the classes' collaborators were supposed to be used together: "the class should call this method on this collaborator, and pass the result to this other collaborator" which gave a much more focussed, descriptive and clearly-motivated set of tests (and generally, the resulting set of tests is small).

This obviously has its flaws: the tests are now strongly coupled to the specifics of the implementation of the controller class, rather than the much more flexible "what would an end-user of this class see that he would care about?". But really, the tests are already quite coupled to it by virtue of the fact that they must configure all of the Test Double collaborators to behave in the exact way required by the implementation to give the correct results from an end-user of the classes' point of view.

So my question is: do fellow TDD'ers find that a minority of classes do little but marshall their (small) set of collaborators around? Do you find keeping the tests for such classes to be written from an end-user of the classes' point of view to be imprecise and unsatisfactory and if so, is it acceptable to write tests for such classes explicitly in terms of how it calls and transfers data between their collaborators?

Hope it's reasonably clear what I'm driving at, here! :)


As a concrete example: one practise project I was working on was a TV listings downloader/ viewer (if you've ever seen "Digiguide", you'll know the kind of thing I mean), and I was implementing a core part of the app - the part that actually updates the listings over the net and integrates the newly downloaded listings into the current set of known TV programs. The interface to this (surprisingly complex when all requirements are taken on board) functionality was a class called ListingsUpdater, which had a method called "updateListings".

Now, end-users of ListingsUpdater only really care about a few things: after listingsUpdate has been called, is the database of TV listings now correct, and were the changes made to the database (adding TV programs, changing them if broadcast changes occurred etc) described to the provided change listeners? When the implementation was a very, very simple "fake it till you make it" type of deal, this worked fine: but as I progressively drove the implementation towards one that would work in the real-world, the "real work" got driven further and further away from ListingsUpdater, until it mainly just marshalled a few collaborators: a ListingsRequestPreparer for assessing the current state of the listings and building HTTP requests for a ListingsDownloader, and a ListingsIntegrator which unpacked the newly downloaded listings and incorporated them (it too delegating to collaborators) into the listings database. Now, note that in order to fulfil the contract of ListingsUpdater from a user's point of view, I must, in the test, instruct its ListingsIntegrator Test Double to populate the (fake) database with the correct data(!), which seems bizarre. It seems much more sensible to drop the "from the end-user of ListingsUpdater's point of view" tests and instead add a test that says "when the ListingsDownloader has downloaded the new listings ensure they are handed over to the ListingsIntegrator".

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This obviously has its flaws: the tests are now strongly coupled to the specifics of the implementation of the controller class, rather than the much more flexible "what would an end-user of this class see that he would care about?". But really, the tests are already quite coupled to it by virtue of the fact that they must configure all of the Test Double collaborators to behave in the exact way required by the implementation to give the correct results from an end-user of the classes' point of view.

I'll repeat what I said in answer to another question:

I need to create either a mock a stub or a dummy object [a test double] for each dependency

This is commonly stated. But I think it is wrong. If a Car is associated with an Engine object, why not use a real Engine object when unit testing your Car class?

But, someone will declare, if you do that you are not unit testing your code; your test depends on both the Car class and the Engine class: two units, so an integration test rather than a unit test. But do those people mock the String class too? Or HashSet<String>? Of course not. The line between unit and integration testing is not so clear.

More philosophically, you can not create good mock objects [test doubles] in many cases. The reason is that, for most methods, the manner in which an object delegates to associated objects is undefined. Whether it does delegate, and how, is left by the contract as an implementation detail. The only requirement is that, on delegating, the method satisfies the preconditions of its delegate. In such a situation, only a fully functional (non-mock) delegate will do. If the real object checks its preconditions, failure to satisfy a precondition on delegating will cause a test failure. And debugging that test failure will be easy.


And I'll add in response to

they were invariably "happy-path" tests that didn't really seem to get to the heart of the matter

This is a more general testing problem, not specific to TDD or unit testing: how to you select a good set of test-cases, given that comprehensive testing is impossible? I rely on equivalence partitioning. When I start work on some code, I use equivalence partitioning to select the set of test-cases I want the code to pass, then work on each in turn in a TDD manner, but if passing one of the test-cases does not require a code change (because early work has created code that also satisfies that test case) I still add the test-case to my test-suite. My test suite therefore has better coverage of potential error paths.

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Thanks for the thought-provoking reply; the comment about sometimes simply not being able to create good Test Doubles was especially useful, and I wonder how often it happens and if particular kinds of classes are more prone to it. It interests me that ListingsUpdater was initially driven by unit tests but as more and more functionality was pushed out, it came to have much the same character as GOOSGBT's end-to-end tests: now that I come to think of it, these particular unit tests probably duplicated my end-to-end tests anyway! –  SSJ_GZ Mar 16 '12 at 14:35
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