Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I've got a little Swing Application with a Menu. First two attributes containing the menues text are created, then the lookandfeel is set to windows and at last the menues are filled. Here is the source code:

private JMenu[] Menue={new JMenu("File")};

private JMenuItem[][] MenuItemsString ={{new JMenuItem("Import"),new JMenuItem("Export")}};
...
public window(){
       super ("Q3MeshConverter");

       plate = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
       try{
           UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsLookAndFeel");// set Windows lookandfeel
           }
           catch(Exception x){

           }
       menuBar = new JMenuBar();
       ...
       setJMenuBar(menuBar);

       JMenu[] Menu =Menue;
       JMenuItem[][] MenuItems =MenuItemsString;
       for(int m=0;m<Menu.length;m++){// loop trough the Menu(es)
           menuBar.add(Menu[m]);
           for(int mi=0;mi<MenuItems[m].length;mi++){// loop through the MenuItems
               Menu[m].add(MenuItems[m][mi]);
               MenuItems[m][mi].addActionListener(this);
           }
       }
       ...   
       setContentPane (plate);
}

And that's the ugly output:

Why does it looks like this?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried checking the exception instead of ignoring it to make sure the l&f has actually been changed: catch(Exception x){ System.out.println("Could not change the look and feel");} –  assylias Mar 15 '12 at 12:30
    
Thank you, but I've checked it now and there were no Exception. –  Martin Erhardt Mar 15 '12 at 12:34
    
If you change the setLookAndFeel(...) to setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName()) anything changes? –  Sérgio Michels Mar 15 '12 at 12:39
    
please learn java naming conventions and stick to them –  kleopatra Mar 15 '12 at 13:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Set the look and feel in your main method:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
    } catch (Exception e) { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is the simplest approach to the problem; just put it before any code inside the main method. –  eee Mar 15 '12 at 12:57

There is no magic how a component created before the LAF change can know about it, you have to tell it :-)

SwingUtilities.updateComponentTreeUI(someComponent);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.