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  1. What do you people think about this solution to encapsulate a collection and be able to know when an iten is added/removed.

  2. How can I add a clicable link to the xml description?

    // Why does DoNotExposeGenericLists recommend that I expose Collection instead of List? by David Kean"
    // http://blogs.msdn.com/b/codeanalysis/archive/2006/04/27/585476.aspx
    public class CollectionEx<T> : Collection<T>
    {
    public event EventHandler ItemAdded;
    public event EventHandler ItemRemoved;
    
    public CollectionEx()//:base()
    {
    }
    
    protected override void InsertItem(int index, T item)
    {
        base.InsertItem(index, item);
        OnSectionAdded(EventArgs.Empty);
    }
    
    protected override void RemoveItem(int index)
    {
        base.RemoveItem(index);
        OnSectionRemoved(EventArgs.Empty);
    }
    
    public new void Add(T item)
    {
        base.Add(item);
        OnSectionAdded(EventArgs.Empty);
    }
    public new bool Remove(T item)
    {
        bool ok = base.Remove(item);
        OnSectionRemoved(EventArgs.Empty);
        return ok;
    }
    
    protected override void ClearItems()
    {
        base.ClearItems();
    }
    
    protected virtual void OnSectionRemoved(EventArgs e)
    {
        EventHandler handler = this.ItemRemoved;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }
    
    protected virtual void OnSectionAdded(EventArgs e)
    {
        EventHandler handler = this.ItemAdded;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }
    

    }

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4  
I think you just re-invented ObservableCollections. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms668604.aspx –  Steve Wellens Mar 15 '12 at 12:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use ObservableCollection<T> for this purpose. No need to write it yourself.

Besides: When subclassing Collection<T> it's enough to override the protected virtual methods. All other public methods will invoke them.
If you additionally hide the non-virtual ones the way you did, events might be triggered multiple times (and in your case, when clearing the collection, no event will be triggered).

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owwwww! I didnt know that class! Sorry! Well, the blog guy didn't know either! :P. Thanks a lot!!! And thanks to clarify the virtual/public mess that I did. –  Pedro77 Mar 15 '12 at 12:45
2  
I think at the time the blog post was made (Apr 2006), there was no ObservableCollection - it was released together with .NET 3.0 (Nov 2006) ;-) –  Matthias Mar 15 '12 at 12:51
    
yeah! nice point! :D –  Pedro77 Mar 15 '12 at 16:25

Something like this exists already, have a look at the ObservableCollection<T>.

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There is an ObservableCollection shipped with .NET 4.0. The CollectionChanged event delivers details information on what has been modified, added or deleted.

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2  
ObservableCollection<T> was there since .NET 3.0: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms668604%28v=vs.85%29.aspx –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 15 '12 at 12:38

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