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I was wondering if it is possible to check whether there is an instance of an object(my gui) open in Java and if so how I would be able to find it?

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Yes, it's possible. No we can't tell you how without knowing things like which graphics library you're using etc. – Thomas Mar 15 '12 at 12:42
    
Do you mean to find it within the same process or from outside? – AlexR Mar 15 '12 at 12:42
    
from within the same process – Biscuit128 Mar 15 '12 at 12:43
    
What is the purpose of finding other instances? Do you want to offer a 'single instance' UI? – Andrew Thompson Mar 15 '12 at 13:02
    
@AndrewThompson yes this is correct - I just want a single instance user interface – Biscuit128 Mar 15 '12 at 13:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use following code if this question is for swing window like JFrame or JDialog,

    java.awt.Window win[] = java.awt.Window.getWindows();   
    for(int i=0;i<win.length;i++){   
        if (win[i].getName().equals("YourWindowName"))
          isOpen = true;
          break; 
    }   

For this ypu need to give name to your JFrame and if that matches with open windows it will set true and return.

share|improve this answer
    
That will not identify window instances created by other JVMs. – Andrew Thompson Mar 15 '12 at 14:00
    
No but it is same process anyway – Rahul Borkar Mar 15 '12 at 14:01
    
Read the OP's last comment "I just want a single instance user interface". If the user causes another instance to start, it will have it's own JVM, with it's own array of Window instances. – Andrew Thompson Mar 15 '12 at 14:04

I used RMI to solve the same problem. My application creates Registry and places a lock object there after start. If lock object is already there at that time then it sends message via RMI to existing application and terminates. The sent message triggers existing application to move its window on top. Here is the code

public static void main(String[] args) {
    RmiManager rmiManager = new RmiManager();
    rmiManager.createRmiRegistry();

    if(rmiManager.isAlreadyRunning()) {
        logger.error("Another application instance is running! Exit");
        System.exit(0);
        return;
    }

    rmiManager.registerApplication();
}

RmiManager.java which is actually responsible for all the stuff

package myapp;

import java.rmi.AccessException;
import java.rmi.AlreadyBoundException;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.rmi.registry.LocateRegistry;
import java.rmi.NotBoundException;
import java.rmi.registry.Registry;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
import java.rmi.server.UnicastRemoteObject;

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;

public class RmiManager {

    private static final String LOCK_OBJECT_NAME = "myapp";
    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(RmiManager.class);

    public void createRmiRegistry() {
        try {
            logger.debug("Creating RMI registry...");
            LocateRegistry.createRegistry(Registry.REGISTRY_PORT);
            logger.debug("RMI registry was created");
        } catch (RemoteException e) {
            logger.debug("RMI registry is already created");
        }
    }

    public boolean isAlreadyRunning() {
        try {
            logger.debug("Checking if application is already running. Looking for RMI registry...");
            Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry();
            logger.debug("RMI registry obtained. Looking for RmiListener: " + LOCK_OBJECT_NAME + "...");

            try {
                IRmiListener rmiListener = (IRmiListener) registry.lookup(LOCK_OBJECT_NAME);
                logger.debug("RmiListener got. Checking...");
                boolean isAlreadyRunning = rmiListener.isAlreadyRunning();
                logger.debug("IsAlreadyRunning result: " + isAlreadyRunning);
                return isAlreadyRunning;
            } catch (AccessException e) {
                logger.error("Error accessing RMI registry!", e);
                return false;
            } catch (NotBoundException e) {
                logger.debug("RMI listener wasn't found. There are no other application instances running");
                return false;
            }
        } catch (RemoteException e) {
            logger.error("RemoteException!", e);
            return false;
        }
    }

    public void registerApplication() {
        try {
            logger.debug("Registering application...");
            RmiListenerImpl rmiListenerImpl = new RmiListenerImpl();
            logger.debug("Exporting RmiListener object...");
            IRmiListener rmiListener = (IRmiListener) UnicastRemoteObject.exportObject(rmiListenerImpl, Registry.REGISTRY_PORT);
            logger.debug("RmiListener object was exported. Looking for RMI registry...");
            Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry();
            logger.debug("RMI registry found");

            try {
                logger.debug("Binding RmiListener to " + LOCK_OBJECT_NAME + "...");
                registry.bind(LOCK_OBJECT_NAME, rmiListener);
                logger.debug("RmiListener binding was done. Application registration complete.");
            } catch (AccessException e) {
                logger.error("AccessException!", e);
            } catch (AlreadyBoundException e) {
                logger.error("RmiListener object is already bind", e);
            }
        } catch (RemoteException e) {
            logger.error("RemoteException!", e);
        }
    }
}

IRmiListener.java

package myapp;

import java.rmi.Remote;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;

public interface IRmiListener extends Remote {
    boolean isAlreadyRunning() throws RemoteException;
}

RmiListenerImpl.java

package myapp;

import java.rmi.RemoteException;

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;

public class RmiListenerImpl implements IRmiListener {
    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger( RmiListenerImpl.class );

    @Override
    public boolean isAlreadyRunning() throws RemoteException {
        // here I notify my GUI class to pop up the window
        return true;
    }
} 

It can be more simple I think.

share|improve this answer

Assuming that by "open UI objects" you mean Swing dialogs and frames, it is better to design the application in a way that would remove the need to look for open instances all together.

This can be achieved by providing a factory that would produce application dialogs and frames instead of using something like new JFrame. This factory would register the produced instances internally and would serve as a single point of reference for all "open UI objects".

Although, be careful when implementing such solution as every registered object would have one additional reference preventing GC from collecting the allocated memory as intended. Please used weak references (weak reference map) for caching. A good blog post about different kinds of Java references can be found here.

This way if you need to find an open UI object, simply request your factory to provide a list of open instances.

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