Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From the examples on the PowerMock homepage, I see the following example for partially mocking a private method with Mockito:

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
// We prepare PartialMockClass for test because it's final or we need to mock private or static methods
@PrepareForTest(PartialMockClass.class)
public class YourTestCase {
@Test
public void privatePartialMockingWithPowerMock() {        
    PartialMockClass classUnderTest = PowerMockito.spy(new PartialMockClass());

    // use PowerMockito to set up your expectation
    PowerMockito.doReturn(value).when(classUnderTest, "methodToMock", "parameter1");

    // execute your test
    classUnderTest.execute();

    // Use PowerMockito.verify() to verify result
    PowerMockito.verifyPrivate(classUnderTest, times(2)).invoke("methodToMock", "parameter1");
}

However, this approach does not seem to work when the private method we wish to mock is static. I wish to create a partial mock of the below class, with the readFile method mocked:

package org.rich.powermockexample;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.charset.Charset;
import java.util.List;

import static com.google.common.io.Files.readLines;

public class DataProvider {

    public static List<String> getData() {
        List<String> data = null;
        try {
            data = readFile();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return data;
    }

    private static List<String> readFile() throws IOException {
        File file = new File("/some/path/to/file");
        List<String> lines = readLines(file, Charset.forName("utf-8"));
        return lines;
    }

}

Please could someone let me know how this can be achieved?

share|improve this question
    
Why, exactly? In other words, what can't you simulate by mocking only getData? –  Dave Newton Mar 15 '12 at 13:04
    
I could - but I wanted to see whether it is possible to handle private static methods in a partial mock with PowerMock. –  Rich Ashworth Mar 15 '12 at 13:10
    
Oh. I'd have to look up the mechanics, but AFAIK yes, via byte-code manipulation, same way you can, say, mock out or replace a constructor. –  Dave Newton Mar 15 '12 at 13:12
    
Agree - I'd have thought it was at least possible, but couldn't find a way to do this from the docs. –  Rich Ashworth Mar 15 '12 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

After doing a bit more research, it seems that PowerMockito.spy() and PowerMockito.doReturn() are what is required here:

package com.richashworth.powermockexample;

import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.BeforeClass;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito;
import org.powermock.core.classloader.annotations.PrepareForTest;
import org.powermock.modules.junit4.PowerMockRunner;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;


@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest({DataProvider.class})
public class ResultsWriterTest {

    private static List<String> mockData = new ArrayList<String>();
    private ResultsWriter resultsWriter;

    @BeforeClass
    public static void setUpOnce() {
        final String firstLine = "Line 1";
        final String secondLine = "Line 2";
        mockData.add(firstLine);
        mockData.add(secondLine);
    }

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        resultsWriter = new ResultsWriter();
    }

    @Test
    public void testGetDataAsString() throws Exception {
        PowerMockito.spy(DataProvider.class);
        PowerMockito.doReturn(mockData).when(DataProvider.class, "readFile");

        final String expectedData = "Line 1\nLine 2\n";
        final String returnedString = resultsWriter.getDataAsString();

        assertEquals(expectedData, returnedString);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
For the complete code listing for this example, check out my blog post here –  Rich Ashworth Mar 16 '12 at 0:37
2  
1+: Beautiful answer, mate. Works like a charm. Not even the PowerMock website has this described as well as you did. –  acdcjunior Aug 19 '13 at 17:48

Test class:

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest(DataProvider.class)
public class DataProviderTest {

    @Test
    public void testGetDataWithMockedRead() throws Exception {
        mockStaticPartial(DataProvider.class, "readFile");

        Method[] methods = MemberMatcher.methods(DataProvider.class, "readFile");
        expectPrivate(DataProvider.class, methods[0]).andReturn(Arrays.asList("ohai", "kthxbye"));
        replay(DataProvider.class);

        List<String> theData = DataProvider.getData();
        assertEquals("ohai", theData.get(0));
        assertEquals("kthxbye", theData.get(1));
    }

}

Class being tested (basically yours):

public class DataProvider {

    public static List<String> getData() {
        try {
            return readFile();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
    }

    private static List<String> readFile() throws IOException {
        File file = new File("/some/path/to/file");
        return readLines(file, Charset.forName("utf-8"));
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thanks. That looks like it does what I'm looking for. I didn't find the mockStaticPartial method in the api though - were you using powermock-mockito for this, or is this in the easymock branch? –  Rich Ashworth Mar 15 '12 at 15:11
1  
From the changelogs, I see: "* Removed mockStatic(Class<?> type, Method method, Method... methods), mockStaticPartial, mockPartial, mock(Class<T> type, Method... methods) & mock(Class<T> type, Method... methods) from the Mockito extension API. You should use PowerMockito.spy instead." As we are trying to mock a static method, I can't see how this can be done if an instance of the class under test is given to the spy() method. –  Rich Ashworth Mar 15 '12 at 15:16
    
@RichAshworth EasyMock, but may not matter. –  Dave Newton Mar 15 '12 at 15:16
    
Ok. Thanks for the help. This certainly works with the EasyMock fork. Thinkg I've found an approach that works with the Mockito version - will post the solution as an alternative answer. –  Rich Ashworth Mar 15 '12 at 15:25

In general, only use static mocking for classes that are beyond your control (e.g. java.io.File). Since DataProvider and readFile are your own, refactor DataProvider into a proper class (i.e. make its methods non-static), pull out readFile into a helper object and then mock that. See this answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/8819339/116509.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Thanks for the response. I agree that this example is a little contrived, but I put it together to explore what PowerMock is capable of rather than to solve a particular problem. Are you saying that it simply isn't possible to use PowerMock here? –  Rich Ashworth Mar 15 '12 at 13:07
    
I don't know but in my experience, if you're mocking private static methods on your own classes, you're probably doing something wrong. –  artbristol Mar 15 '12 at 13:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.