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Is there a "computationally" quick way to get the count of an iterator?

int i = 0;
for ( ; some_iterator.hasNext() ; ++i ) some_iterator.next();

... seems like a waste of CPU cycles.

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2  
An iterator doesn't necessarily correspond to something with a "count"... –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 15 '12 at 13:01
    
Iterators are what they are; to iterate to the next object of a collection (it can be anything like set, array, etc.) Why do they need to tell the size when they don't care what they are trying to iterate for? to provide an implementation-independent method for access, in which the user does not need to know whether the underlying implementation is some form of array or of linked list, and allows the user go through the collection without explicit indexing. penguin.ewu.edu/~trolfe/LinkedSort/Iterator.html –  eee Mar 15 '12 at 13:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

If you've just got the iterator then that's what you'll have to do - it doesn't know how many items it's got left to iterate over, so you can't query it for that result.

However, many iterators come from collections, which you can often query for their size. And if it's a user made class you're getting the iterator for, you could look to provide a size() method on that class.

In short, in the situation where you only have the iterator then there's no better way, but much more often than not you have access to the underlying collection or object from which you may be able to get the size directly.

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Using Guava library:

int size = Iterators.size(iterator);

Internally it just iterates over all elements so its just for convenience.

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There is no better way, if all you have is the iterator.

The solution is either to change your application so that it doesn't need the count, or obtain it by some other means. (For instance pass a Collection rather than Iterator ...)

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If all you have is the iterator, then no, there is no "better" way. If the iterator comes from a collection you could as that for size.

Keep in mind that Iterator is just an interface for traversing distinct values, you would very well have code such as this

    new Iterator<Long>() {
        final Random r = new Random();
        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public Long next() {
            return r.nextLong();
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not implemented");
        }
    };

or

    new Iterator<BigInteger>() {
        BigInteger next = BigInteger.ZERO;

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public BigInteger next() {
            BigInteger current = next;
            next = next.add(BigInteger.ONE);
            return current;
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not implemented");
        }
    }; 
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Your code will give you an exception when you reach the end of the iterator. You could do:

int i = 0;
while(iterator.hasNext()) {
    i++;
    iterator.next();
}

If you had access to the underlying collection, you would be able to call coll.size()...

EDIT OK you have amended...

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iterator object contains the same number of elements what your collection contained.

List<E> a =...;
Iterator<E> i = a.iterator();
int size = a.size();//Because iterators size is equal to list a's size.

But instead of getting the size of iterator and iterating through index 0 to that size, it is better to iterate through the method next() of the iterator.

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