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I have an html page with the following content:

[...]
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td></tr>
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.2.1.zip">play-1.0.2.1.zip</a></td></tr>
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.2.zip">play-1.0.2.zip</a></td></tr>
[...]

And I'd like to extract just

play-1.0.1.zip
play-1.0.2.1.zip
play-1.0.2.zip

to then find the latest version (in this case it would be play-1.0.2.1.zip)

So I tried with

cat tmp.html | grep "<a href=\".*\""

<a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td><td class="m"
<a href="play-1.0.2.1.zip">play-1.0.2.1.zip</a></td><td class="m"
<a href="play-1.0.2.zip">play-1.0.2.zip</a></td><td class="m"

So I tried with lazy:

cat tmp.html | grep "<a href=\".*?\""

and negating the quotes

cat tmp.html | grep "<a href=\"[^\"]*?\""

both of them returning nothing

I need to get only the matching part (not the href), and then to find the latest, but I'm stuck with this greediness problem...

--

thanks a lot for all the answers, they were all pretty useful, it's hard to decide which one is correct, in the end I've solved it with:

grep -v '.*-RC.*' index.html | grep -oP 'play-1.*?.zip' | sort -Vru | head -1
share|improve this question
1  
grep -E "<a href=\"(.*?)\"" will match it, but grep will print the whole line. You can try with grep -o -E, but it will print <a href="play-1.0.1.zip"...Then you can strip the remaining chars with sed. –  strkol Mar 15 '12 at 13:08
1  
There is no need to use cat tmp.html with grep because grep can handle files on it's own. You should use grep -E pattern tmp.html. –  piotrekkr Mar 15 '12 at 13:17

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Contrary to other answers, this can be done entirely with grep.

Your output differs slightly from your input - there are extra elements showing up. For the purposes of this answer I'm going to use this file:

<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td></tr>
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.2.1.zip">play-1.0.2.1.zip</a></td><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td></tr>
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.2.zip">play-1.0.2.zip</a></td><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td></tr>

There are a few things you need to do here. First, you need to set the correct grep switches. You need:

  • -o to only output the matched portion of each line
  • -P to use the Perl compatible regex engine

Now you can use the ? modifier to prevent greedy matching:

grep -o -P '<a href=".*?"' test.html

<a href="play-1.0.1.zip"
<a href="play-1.0.1.zip"
<a href="play-1.0.2.1.zip"
<a href="play-1.0.1.zip"
<a href="play-1.0.2.zip"
<a href="play-1.0.1.zip"

That's not quite right, so we'll anchor the regex to the first match of the line:

grep -o -P '^<tr><td class="n"><a href=".*?"' test.html

<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.1.zip"
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.2.1.zip"
<tr><td class="n"><a href="play-1.0.2.zip"

That's the right data, but with too much cruft. What we need to use is zero width assertions (part of the PCRE syntax). Essentially bits of regular expression that do not count toward the matched pattern.

grep -o -P '(?<=^<tr><td class="n"><a href=").*?(?=")' test.html

play-1.0.1.zip
play-1.0.2.1.zip
play-1.0.2.zip

Now you can do whatever you need to sort the list. More information on zero width assertions can be found here: http://www.regular-expressions.info/lookaround.html

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice answer to show how you iterate to the regex. –  glenn jackman Mar 15 '12 at 13:51

With GNU tools, you can do

grep -oP '(?<=<td class="n"><a href=")[^"]+' | sort -Vr | head -1
share|improve this answer
$ grep 'href=' tmp.html | sed 's/.*href="\(.*\)".*/\1/'
play-1.0.1.zip
play-1.0.2.1.zip
play-1.0.2.zip
share|improve this answer
    
All right ...finally a sed solution :)... Well this does not seem to work if the file contains other lines, so pipe this after grep? –  another.anon.coward Mar 15 '12 at 13:23
    
yeah, correct, fixed it, still the shortest solution yet :-) –  strkol Mar 15 '12 at 13:28

Didn't see cut (and I like it for its brevity & speed) so:

cut -d\" -f4 tmp.html | sort -Vu | tail -1

output:

play-1.0.2.1.zip

share|improve this answer

try it with -E switch:

piotrekkr@piotrekkr-desktop:~$ echo '<a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td>' | grep -E '<a href=".*?"'
<a href="play-1.0.1.zip">play-1.0.1.zip</a></td>
share|improve this answer
1  
This works because grep uses a basic regex engine by default. The -E, -F, and -P switches change the engine used. See the man page for more details. –  Spencer Rathbun Mar 15 '12 at 13:16

grep doesn't seem like the right tool for this, since you want to extract a submatch.

Here's a perl one-liner that would do it though:

$ perl -ne 'while(/<a href="([^"]+)"/g){print $1, "\n";}' input 
play-1.0.1.zip
play-1.0.2.1.zip
play-1.0.2.zip
share|improve this answer

Using the answer provided by Craig Andrews with the addition of OSX support.

grep -o -P '(?<=^<tr><td class="n"><a href=").*?(?=")' /test.html | sort -n -r -k1.10,12

Result:

play-1.0.2.1.zip
play-1.0.2.zip
play-1.0.1.zip
share|improve this answer
    
Just as added help for those os x only users. sort -V is unavailable by default in OSX. This should also work on other UNIX based machines. –  E1Suave Apr 18 '12 at 19:52

Awk is a great tool, if you know the field numbers:

awk -F\" '$4 ~ /play.*zip/{ print $4 }'

Or this is a kind of messy way; search for all zip files:

cat file | tr '"' '\n' | grep -e '.zip$' | sort -u

That will get all the zip files for you. The tr utility is underused a lot, it just does a character replacement, in this case replacing each double quote with a newline, nicely getting quoted data on its own line where you can grep it. The sort -u avoids dups.

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A perl way:

cat thefile | perl -anF'"' -e 'print $F[3],"\n";($v)=$F[3]=~/(\d.*\d)/;$m=$v if$v gt $m;}{print "max=$m\n";'

output:

play-1.0.1.zip
play-1.0.2.1.zip
play-1.0.2.zip
max=1.0.2.1
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