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So I have a situation like this: A needs to call B service and A gets to know only B address and only at runtime. But both have same service contract in advance.

So far I have this (at A):

    using (ChannelFactory<IService1> scf = new ChannelFactory<IService1>(new BasicHttpBinding(), "B's adress"))
    {
        var channel = scf.CreateChannel();
        channel.GetData(5);
        ...
    }

    [ServiceContract]
    public interface IService1
    {
        [OperationContract]
        string GetData(int value);

        [OperationContract]
        CompositeType GetDataUsingDataContract(CompositeType composite);
    }
    [DataContract]
    public class CompositeType
    { 
       [DataMember]
       public bool BoolValue
        ...

       [DataMember]
       public string StringValue
        ...
    }

B exposes same service contract.

Now the question. With GetData everything works fine, but with GetDataUsingDataContract which takes and returns composite type - it seems that B receives object with default values and not what has been sent. What could be wrong?

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1  
Is CompositeType defined in assembly C that is used by both A and B? If not, where is it defined? – Daniel Hilgarth Mar 15 '12 at 13:13
    
@Daniel Hilgarth It's defined in the same way both at A and B. Hm, I'll give that a try. – ren Mar 15 '12 at 13:19
    
@Daniel Hilgarth yeah, it worked! Thanks. – ren Mar 15 '12 at 14:33
    
Good :-) I posted it as an answer, please upvote and accept, thanks. – Daniel Hilgarth Mar 15 '12 at 14:37
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Put CompositeType into an assembly C and reference that in A and B.

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