Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a simple way to get a system's uptime using C#?

share|improve this question
1  
dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/265089/… –  Inisheer Jun 9 '09 at 20:06
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted
public TimeSpan UpTime {
    get {
        using (var uptime = new PerformanceCounter("System", "System Up Time")) {
            uptime.NextValue();       //Call this an extra time before reading its value
            return TimeSpan.FromSeconds(uptime.NextValue());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first call to uptime.NextValue will return 0. –  SLaks Jun 9 '09 at 20:12
3  
What if counter name is localized? –  abatishchev Mar 5 '13 at 0:44
    
Perfect, thanks. –  mack Jul 15 '13 at 15:46
2  
Get localised names (2 = System, 674 = System Up Time) using: StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder(1024); uint buf_size = (uint)buffer.Capacity; Win32.PdhLookupPerfNameByIndex(null, id, buffer, ref buf_size); return buffer.ToString(); –  Oliver Bock Jul 24 '13 at 0:41
add comment

System.Environment.TickCount gets the number of milliseconds since the system was restarted.

Beware though that it is an Int32 and will overflow after 24.9 days and will become negative. See the remarks on the MDSN docs.

share|improve this answer
1  
To be pedantic, convert that property to milliseconds with TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Michael Petrotta Jun 9 '09 at 19:52
2  
Or, better yet, call TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds –  SLaks Jun 9 '09 at 19:58
    
@SlLaks - am I missing something? You've got to get milliseconds from ticks before you can get a TimeSpan from milliseconds. –  Michael Petrotta Jun 9 '09 at 20:03
    
@SLaks - or maybe you mean TimeSpan.FromTicks(). –  Michael Petrotta Jun 9 '09 at 20:07
1  
Confusingly, Environment.TickCount returns a number of milliseconds, not .Net ticks (A .Net tick is 100 nanoseconds). –  SLaks Jun 9 '09 at 20:26
show 3 more comments

I'm a bit late, but another simple way is to use the GetTickCount64 function, which is available starting with Windows Vista and does not overflow as GetTickCount does:

public static TimeSpan GetUpTime()
{
    return TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(GetTickCount64());
}

[DllImport("kernel32")]
extern static UInt64 GetTickCount64();
share|improve this answer
    
This was exactly what I needed, thank you much for posting this :) –  Tom Anderson Jul 2 '13 at 17:15
add comment

The simplest and proper way to do this is

public static TimeSpan GetUptime()
{
    ManagementObject mo = new ManagementObject(@"\\.\root\cimv2:Win32_OperatingSystem=@");
    DateTime lastBootUp = ManagementDateTimeConverter.ToDateTime(mo["LastBootUpTime"].ToString());
    return DateTime.Now.ToUniversalTime() - lastBootUp.ToUniversalTime();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This returns an exception with the message:Invalid object path on Windows 2003 Server running in a web service in IIS6 –  Hugh Jeffner Jan 11 '11 at 15:56
add comment

Simple, no but it can be done:

    static DateTime getLastBootTime(ManagementObject mObject)
    {
        PropertyData pd = mObject.Properties["LastBootUpTime"];
        string name = pd.Name.ToString();
        DateTime lastBoot = parseCmiDateTime(pd.Value.ToString());
        return lastBoot;
    }

    static ManagementObject getServerOSObject(string serverName)
    {
        ManagementObjectSearcher mSearcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * From Win32_OperatingSystem");
        mSearcher.Scope = new ManagementScope(String.Format(@"\\{0}\root\cimv2", serverName));
        ManagementObjectCollection mObjects = mSearcher.Get();
        if (mObjects.Count != 1) throw new Exception(String.Format("Expected 1 object, returned {0}.", mObjects.Count));
        foreach (ManagementObject m in mObjects)
        {
            //No indexing on collection
            return m;
        }
        throw new Exception("Something went wrong!");
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Precise and bigger than System.Environment.TickCount, not involving OS horrific perf counters, WMI or native calls:

var ticks = Stopwatch.GetTimestamp();
var uptime = ((double)ticks) / Stopwatch.Frequency;
var uptimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(uptime);
share|improve this answer
add comment

I know question is both old and solved, but the esiest solution I can tink of is just using the Enviroment.TickCount property, which returns the number of millisecounds since the system started:

System.DateTime SystemStartTime = DateAndTime.Now.AddMilliseconds(-Environment.TickCount);
System.DateTime Uptime = DateAndTime.Now - SystemStartTime;

This solition is a lot faster than the accepted answare.

share|improve this answer
    
TickCount is returned as an integer but the system timer has more resolution so there is an extended period of time where the tick count is int.MaxValue, and then eventually it goes down to int.MinValue. This method is not useful for servers that are up for months at a time. Technically system timer resolution is also only accurate up to blocks of 10 to 16 milliseconds. –  TheXenocide Oct 11 '13 at 14:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.