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Sample code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>test</title>

    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">

    function init() {
        var nodeList = document.getElementsByTagName("a");
        var nodeArr = [];
        for( var i = 0; i < nodeList.length; i++) // Copy NodeList to Array
            nodeArr.push(nodeList[i]);
        for( var i = 0; i < nodeArr.length; i++) // Loop over array
            if( nodeArr[i].className == "clickLink" )
                nodeArr[i].onclick = clickLink2;    // Attach event function
    }

    window.onload = init; //Attach event function

    function clickLink2() { 
        console.log("this: " + this); //Prints window URL in href
        console.dir( this ); //show attributes of anchor    
        console.log( this.name ); // Prints name attribute
    }


    function clickLink( elem ) {
        console.log( "this: " + this ); //Prints [object Window]
        console.dir( this ); // Shows attributes, etc. al of [object Window]
        console.log( "name: " + elem.name );    
    }
    </script>

    </head>

    <body>

    <!-- inline -->
    <a href="#" name="blah1" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 1</a>
    <a href="#" name="blah2" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 2</a>
    <a href="#" name="blah3" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 3</a>
    <a href="#" name="blah4" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 4</a>


    <hr/>
    <!-- not inline -->
    <a href="#" name="blah5" class="clickLink">Test 5</a>
    <a href="#?t" name="blah6" class="clickLink">Test 6</a>
    <a href="#" name="blah7" class="clickLink">Test 7</a>
    <a href="#" name="blah8" class="clickLink">Test 8</a>

    </body>

    </html>

I did the testing in firefox, with firebug to view the console output.

Now what I was wondering:

  1. Why in clickLink does this refer to the window object?
  2. Why does this in clickLink2 print to console as the value of the href of the link?
  3. Is there a better way to pass this to an unobtrusive attachment like this? how can you be sure what this refers to?

OK, so I took pieces from the answers here and found that this is a bit quirky in some browsers. Also that assigning a function to onclick is different then attaching (but unfortunately not all IE versions support that either see addEventListener vs attachEvent). For some reason older IE's also make this inside the body of an event trigger function still refer to the window object instead of the caller. So I used event.srcElement. Here's some new sample code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>test</title>

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">

function init() {
    var nodeList = document.getElementsByTagName("a");
    var nodeArr = [];
    for( var i = 0; i < nodeList.length; i++) // Copy NodeList to Array
        nodeArr.push(nodeList[i]);
    for( var i = 0; i < nodeArr.length; i++) // Loop over array
    if( nodeArr[i].className == "clickLink" ) {

        var a = nodeArr[i];

        if (a.addEventListener) {  //IE9, other browsers
            a.addEventListener('click', clickLink2);    // Attach event function
        } else if (a.attachEvent) { //IE6,7,8, etc.
            a.attachEvent('onclick', clickLink2 ); // Legacy IE Attach event function
        }           

        a.onclick = function() { return false };   // override default onclick behavior for these anchors so URL is not followed
    }
}

window.onload = init; //Attach event function

function clickLink2() {

    if( typeof(event) != 'undefined' ) {
        elem = event.srcElement; //IE < 8 keeps this as window object   
    } else {
        elem = this;    
    }

    alert( elem.name );
}


function clickLink( elem ) {
    alert( elem.name );
}
</script>

</head>

<body>

<!-- inline -->
<a href="#" name="blah1" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 1</a>
<a href="#" name="blah2" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 2</a>
<a href="#" name="blah3" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 3</a>
<a href="#" name="blah4" onclick="clickLink(this); return false;">Test 4</a>


<hr/>
<!-- not inline -->
<a href="#" name="blah5" class="clickLink">Test 5</a>
<a href="#?t" name="blah6" class="clickLink">Test 6</a>
<a href="#" name="blah7" class="clickLink">Test 7</a>
<a href="#" name="blah8" class="clickLink">Test 8</a>

</body>

</html>
share|improve this question
4  
Sounds like you need to read about this –  zzzzBov Mar 15 '12 at 13:54
1  
You are passing a referens to the current element onclick="clickLink(this) and receiving it in function clickLink( elem ) as elem. Why not use that one? –  Stefan Mar 15 '12 at 13:56
1  
@Stefan The code I present wasn't really meant to do anything specific, just to try to figure out what the keyword this was doing in different situations. Combined with zzzzBov's MDN link, the explanations of those below, and my own tinkering I think I have a better handle on this in Javascript now. Thanks all –  user17753 Mar 15 '12 at 14:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) Why in clickLink does this refer to the window object? Put simply: clickLink isn't the event handler, by adding the attribute onclick to the elements, you're using the native onclick method as a handler that calls a function. this function is declared in the main scope, thus this points to the window object. To be clear: the behaviour is similar to this:

<p onclick='function(){window.clickLink(this);}'>

Making the actual event handler an anonymous function, not clickLink. That's why this will point to window: the annonymous function, too, was declared in the global scope, thus the caller of clickLink is window.

2) Why does this in clickLink2 print to console as the value of the href of the link?

Think about this phrase 'Javascript allows you to manipulate the DOM, the DOM-tree, all events and behaviours.' In your init function, the elements onclick behaviour is manipulated. the default method of onclick is being overruled, and replaced by the clickLink2 method here nodeArr[i].onclick = clickLink2;.

Look at it like this: all your elements have a prototype onclick method, that accepts a parameter. In the first case, this parameter is a string, that evaluates to a call to the clickLink function. The second case, however, the instances that have a particular class have their own onclick method, overruling the prototype's onclick.

I do hope this clears things up a bit for you. It's easy once you grasp the basic philosophy behind events, handlers, methods, prototypes etc... and overcome the quirks of JS.

3) Is there a better way to pass this to an unobtrusive attachment like this? how can you be sure what this refers to?

Well, sort of answerd that above, didn't I? but anyhow: if you define a method of an element or object yourself, in general, this will point to the owner object/element. If you rely on html and default behaviours, JS will mostly mind it's own business and this will point to window.

I don't know if this is an option, but maybe you could try something like this:

<a onclick='clickLink'>

this should -in theory- do the same thing as your init function

Edit: A working alternative to the above:

<p onclick='clickLink.call(this)'>

Call defines the p element as the caller of clickLink, making this point to the element that called the function.

share|improve this answer
1  
<a onclick='clickLink'> doesn't actually work. The onclick attribute is not called like a function, it's supposed to contain code that gets ran. <p onclick='function(){window.clickLink(this);}'> does not work either, it should be <p onclick='window.clickLink(this);'>. –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 15 '12 at 14:35
1  
You're right, of course, but the onclick=function(){} bit was to show why this doesn't point to the element in the clickLink function. I hoped it would make it clear that, in the first example clickLink was just a function, not a method of the element. wrote this answer without any checking or rereading, so I'm sorry if not everything is as clear as I thought it was :) –  Elias Van Ootegem Mar 15 '12 at 15:11

When inline event handlers are called, they are ran in the global scope. That's why this is window.

When event handlers are actually attached to an element, they are called in the context of that element, just like when running a method that's part of an object. That makes this the element.

For example:

function test(){
    console.log(this);
}
test();  // window

var obj = {
    test: test
}
obj.test(); // obj

To be sure of what this is, you should attach the event handlers using JS (with element.addEventListener or element.onClick), and not using inline handlers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Right, in my example code I explored both inline and dynamically attached event handlers. I was trying to determine the difference of this between the two methods. It appears that if I attach a function dynamically via addEventListener that this inside the body of the attached function will refer to the caller that raised the event. –  user17753 Mar 15 '12 at 14:25

This was one of the most amazing things I learnt about JavaScript, coming from a .NET background.

this, when used in a method, doesn't refer to a particular object. It refers to the caller, or the object that raised an event that resulted in a call to an event handler.

To answer number 3 of your questions: just copy whatever this refers to to a new variable:

var thisThis = this;
//now pass thisThis. Interesting huh? 
//thisThis will not change with the change of the context. 
//this alone is a keyword that changes depending on
//the context: e.g. who is the caller, what object raised the object, etc. 
share|improve this answer
    
What I was trying to say with #3, was that inline you can pass this no problem as the first argument, such as elem in clickLink. The this in the inline a refers to the element itself and is stored in parameter elem. Whereas, when I attach a function dynamically such as through addEventListener I cannot pass the this in the way I did inline. Which I guess isn't a problem, since this in the body of the attached function refers to the caller anyways. –  user17753 Mar 15 '12 at 14:20
    
Also, I was wondering, with #2: is it just the case that an a tag when printed to console toStrings to the value of its href? –  user17753 Mar 15 '12 at 14:22

this is a variable pointing to the current scope. If you execute the following code in the console:

var myPackage = {}
myPackage.method = function() {console.log(this)}
myPackage.method()

this will be pointing to the myPackage object (the scope of method).

Instead if you try to run the following:

console.log(this) // window

this (window) is the reference to the current browser’s window the script executes in.

share|improve this answer
    
"scope" has a slightly different meaning in JavaScript. It might not be the best word because it is ambiguous. –  pimvdb Mar 15 '12 at 14:02

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