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I know it's possible to make a template function:

template<typename T>
void DoSomeThing(T x){}

and it's possible to make a template class:

template<typename T>
class Object
{
public:
    int x;
};

but is it possible to make a class not within a template, and then make a function in that class a template? Ie:

//I have no idea if this is right, this is just how I think it would look
class Object
{
public:
    template<class T>
    void DoX(){}
};

or something to the extent, where the class is not part of a template, but the function is?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Your guess is the correct one. The only thing you have to remember is that the member function template definition (in addition to the declaration) should be in the header file, not the cpp, though it does not have to be in the body of the class declaration itself.

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1  
And also that you cannot specialize them. :-( –  Frank Krueger Jun 9 '09 at 20:03
6  
Not exactly true. The definition can be in a cpp file, as long as it is called once for each unique template parameter n-uplet from a non-template function/method after it has been defined. –  Benoît Jun 9 '09 at 21:13
    
Hence my "should" - keeping it in the header is the simplest way to accomplish that. –  Not Sure Jun 9 '09 at 22:03
4  
Actually, I believe you can explicitly specialize them, but you cannot partially specialize them. Unfortunately I don't know if this is a compiler-specific extension, or C++ standard. –  Patrick Johnmeyer Jun 10 '09 at 1:14
6  
It's actually standard c++. You can do struct A { template<typename> void f(); }; template<> void A::f<int>() { } for example. You just can't specialize them in class scope, but you can do so well when done in namespace scope. (not to be confused with the scope that the specialization is actually put into: the specialization will still be a member of the class - but its definition is done in namespace scope. Often the scope where something is put into is the same as the scope something is defined at - but that sometimes isn't true, as in all cases of out-of-class definitions) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 10 '09 at 8:48

See here: Templates, template methods,Member Templates, Member Function Templates

class   Vector
{
  int     array[3];

  template <class TVECTOR2> 
  void  eqAdd(TVECTOR2 v2);
};

template <class TVECTOR2>
void    Vector::eqAdd(TVECTOR2 a2)
{
  for (int i(0); i < 3; ++i) array[i] += a2[i];
}
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Yes, template member functions are perfectly legal and useful on numerous occasions.

The only caveat is that template member functions cannot be virtual.

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