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output of this program comes as "Inside Thread Inside Thread" , How this is happening?

class MyThread extends Thread 
{ 
    MyThread() {} 
    MyThread(Runnable r) {super(r); } 
    public void run() 
    { 
        System.out.print("Inside Thread ");
    } 
} 
class MyRunnable implements Runnable 
{ 
    public void run() 
    { 
        System.out.print(" Inside Runnable"); 
    } 
} 
class ThreadRunnableBoth 
{  
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    { 
        new MyThread().start();
        new MyThread(new MyRunnable()).start(); 
    } 
}

I can understand how first "Inside Thread" is printing but for second time print I am expecting to print "Inside Runnable" but it prints "Inside Thread" , how this is happening ? Please explain .....thanks a lot

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The run() method of java.lang.Thread simply calls target.run(), where target is the Runnable provided during construction. However, in MyThread, you've overridden this functionality; your version of run() ignores the target and prints "Inside Thread" instead.

One way to fix it is to run your Runnable with an instance of the base Thread class:

new Thread(new MyRunnable()).start();

Other possibilities would be not to override run(), or to call super.run() from your override.

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Thanks a lot for answers, I got the point now... –  Jayesh Mar 15 '12 at 15:27

In your MyThread class you are overriding the run() method. That means that even though you are passing in the Runnable into the constructor, only your run method will be called and the Runnable target will be ignored.

Here's the Thread.run() method code that you are overriding:

public void run() {
    if (target != null) {
        target.run();
    }
}

If you want to use your runnable I'd do:

new Thread(new MyRunnable()).start();

That does not use the MyThread class.

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The run method in Thread is defined as follows:

public void run() {
  if (target != null) {
    target.run();
  }
}

Because you've overridden run in MyThread, it won't actually call your MyRunnable.

To get the behaviour you're expecting:

new MyThread().start();
new Thread(new MyRunnable()).start(); 
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thanks a lot for explanation –  Jayesh Mar 15 '12 at 15:28
new MyThread().start();

In this case, Thread is created calling the run() method of MyThread class through MyThread() {} constructer.

In the 2nd case, thread is created calling run() method of the same MyThread class through MyThread(Runnable) constructer.

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change the second call to Thread:

new Thread(new MyRunnable()).start

because your custom thread override the run method that will be called even after you passing your runnable to thread constructor.

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