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For some reason, the super() method is not always behaving as expected, opting to return:

TypeError('super(type, obj): obj must be an instance or subtype of type)'

I understand what the error means. I do not understand why it is coming up as an error. Here's the snippet of code that is breaking. All objects in the system are new style objects.

What's really interesting is that this error does not always show up. I don't know what's causing it. The super() method in Retrieval is passing the Retrieval class, and then itself as an object, which is, as far as I'm aware,exactly how super() is supposed to be invoked.

Any thoughts at all?

In file DBConnection.py:

class DBAdminConnection(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.user = DBUserConnection().user 
        self.submissions = DBSubmissionConnection()

In file Retrieval.py

class Retrieval(DBConnection.DBAdminConnection): 
    def __init__(self, username=None, password=None, unique_key=None):
        super(Retrieval,self).__init__()
        if username and password:
            self.username = username
            self.user.login(username,password, config.DATABASE)
            if self.user.error:
                raise UserLoginError(username)
        self.unique_key = unique_key
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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Are you reloading modules somehow in the middle of things? If so, that may explain this error.

isinstance(self,DBAdminConnection) may become false after reloading modules because of the changes to memory references, apparently.

Edit: if you're running your web.py app under mod_wsgi, make sure you're disabling autoreload:

app = web.application(urls, globals(), autoreload=False)
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This is running through webpy. So that is a definite possibility. Especially since if I kill the app instance and respawn it, the problem goes away. Wow. Now the question becomes how the heck to fix it. –  Tom Thorogood Mar 15 '12 at 15:22
    
@TomThorogood: how are you running your app? Are you using mod_wsgi? –  Eduardo Ivanec Mar 15 '12 at 15:38
    
@TomThorogood: added something in case you're using wsgi. –  Eduardo Ivanec Mar 15 '12 at 15:45
    
I don't think I am doing that. I will add that now! I'm not using mod_wsgi. I'm using nginx with spawn-fcgi. I'll try disabling autoreload. Thanks so much! –  Tom Thorogood Mar 15 '12 at 16:55
2  
happened to me exactly as you said because I used the class in IPython with %load_ext autoreload %autoreload 2 –  P.R. Feb 18 at 17:30

If you are using reload() as part of your workflow, you apparently need to also use super(self.__class__, self).__init__ for inheritance initialization.

I suspect you will find this bug coincides with id(self.__class__) ==id(Retrieval) failing.

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4  
super(self.__class__, self) is always wrong. It will become an infinite loop if you subclass any further. –  Blckknght Jun 7 at 14:07
    
What if you don't subclass any further, is that sometimes OK? –  cce Dec 15 at 5:38

I'm not sure why the error is happening, but as an aid to debugging you could wrap the call to super in a try/except block and do a data dump when the exception is raised. Something like this:

class Retrieval(DBConnection.DBAdminConnection): 
    def __init__(self, username=None, password=None, unique_key=None):
        try:
            super(Retrieval,self).__init__()
        except TypeError, e:
            print "Failure initialising Retrieval --> self: %r"
            raise
        if username and password:
            self.username = username
            self.user.login(username,password, config.DATABASE)
            if self.user.error:
                raise UserLoginError(username)
        self.unique_key = unique_key
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Did you mean that you're not sure? Because you got my hopes up for a moment. /grin –  Tom Thorogood Mar 15 '12 at 15:22
    
@TomThorogood: Ack! Yeah, I meant 'not sure' -- sorry! –  Ethan Furman Mar 15 '12 at 15:28
    
haha. no worries! Thanks for the thing. I have some debugging in place; i I was just cleaning up the code for SO. –  Tom Thorogood Mar 15 '12 at 15:35

Agreed that this is a very old question, and there is an accepted answer, and the accepted answer is correct for this scenario. Another scenario is that the pydev debugger hasn't properly reloaded the models after a code change. Just restarting the dev app server does the trick if

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