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I have a common jar that uses some unmarshaling of a String object. The method should act differently depending on which application it is called from, how can I do that besides from the fact that I can identify the application by trying to load some unique class it has (don't like that). Is there some design pattern that solves this issue?

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The "design pattern" that you should be using is simply to not have method behavior change based on external factors! Different behavior should be a different method. –  cdeszaq Mar 15 '12 at 15:01
4  
I second @cdeszaq's comment. Either it's a common jar with common functionality, or it has particular behavior for particular applications. If you are trying to separate out common code in an external jar, this is good. But then you also must write that code as if it doesn't knew who will call it (avoid logical circular references in your code). –  MicSim Mar 15 '12 at 15:17

2 Answers 2

As I alluded to in my comment, the best thing to do is to break that uber-method up into different methods that encapsulate the specific behaviors, and likely also another method (used by all of the app-specific ones) that deals with the common behaviors.

The most important thing to remember is that behavior matters. If something is behaving differently in different scenarios, a calling application effectively cannot use that method because it doesn't have any control over what happens.

If you still really want to have a single method that all of your applications call that behaves differently in each one, you can do it, using a certain design pattern, in a way that makes sense and is maintainable. The pattern is called "Template Method".

The general idea of it is that the calling application passes in a chunk of logic that the called method wraps around and calls when it needs to. This is very similar to functional programming or programming using closures, where you are passing around chunks of logic as if it were data. While Java proper doesn't support closures, other JVM-based languages like Groovy, Scala, Clojure, JRuby, etc. do support closures.

This same general idea is very powerful in certain circumstances, and may apply in your case, but such a question requires very intimate knowledge of the application domain and architecture and there really isn't enough information in your posted question do dig too much deeper.

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Actually, I think a good OO oriented solution is, in the common jar, to have one base class, and several derived classes. The base class would contain the common logic for the method being called, and each derived class would contain specific behavior.

So, in your jar, you might have the following:

public abstact class JarClass {
    public method jarMethod() {
       //common code here        
    }
}

public class JarClassVersion1  extends JarClass {
    public method jarMethod() {
      // initiailzation code specific to JarClassVerion1
      super.jarMethod();
      // wrapup code specific to JarClassVerion1
    }
}

public class JarClassVersion2  extends JarClass {
    public method jarMethod() {
      // initiailzation code specific to JarClassVerion2
      super.jarMethod();
      // wrapup code specific to JarClassVerion2
    }
}

As to how the caller works, if you are willing to design your code so that the knowledge of which derived class to use resides with the caller, then you obviously just have the caller create the appropriate derived class and call jarMethod.

However, I take it from your question, you want the knowledge of which class to use to reside in the jar. In that case, there are several solutions. But a fairly easy one is to define a factory method inside the jar which creates the appropriate derived class. So, inside the abstract JarClass, you might define the following method:

public static JarClass createJarClass(Class callerClass) {
   if (callerClass.equals(CallerClassType1.class)) {
       return new JarClassVersion1();
    } else if (callerClass.equals(CallerClassType2.class)) {
       return new JarClassVersion1();
       // etc. for all derived classess
}

And then the caller would simply do the following:

JarClass.createJarClass(this.getClass()).jarMethod();
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