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I'm running ffmpeg on another machine for screen capture. I'd like to be able to stop it recording remotely. FFMPEG requires that q is pressed to stop encoding as it has to do some finalization to finish the file cleanly. I know I could kill it with kill/killall however this can lead to corrupt videos.

Press [q] to stop encoding

I can't find anything on google specifically for this, but some there is suggestion that echoing into /proc//fd/0 will work.

I've tried this but it does not stop ffmpeg. The q is however shown in the terminal in which ffmpeg is running.

echo -n q > /proc/16837/fd/0

So how can I send a character to another existing process in such a way it is as if it were typed locally? Or is there another way of remotely stopping ffmpeg cleanly.

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Newer versions of ffmpeg don't use 'q' anymore, at least on Ubuntu Oneiric, instead they say to press Ctrl+C to stop them. So with a newer version you can simply use 'killall -INT' to send them SIGINT instead of SIGTERM, and they should exit cleanly. –  sashoalm Mar 15 '12 at 16:33
    
@satuon: That version of Ubuntu is likely using avconv (part of the forked Libav project). That utility has removed 'q' as an option; main FFmpeg still has it. –  Multimedia Mike Mar 15 '12 at 16:44
    
I've since discovered that I can used kill -2 to stop ffmpeg cleanly. I'm still interested in how to simulate key pressed into other applications though. –  Adam Mar 15 '12 at 21:45
    
@satuon Do you want to add your suggestion of Ctrl+C as an answer so I can accept it? –  Adam Apr 18 '12 at 7:36
    
OK, I'll just paste it as an answer. –  sashoalm Apr 18 '12 at 7:41
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2 Answers 2

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Newer versions of ffmpeg don't use 'q' anymore, at least on Ubuntu Oneiric, instead they say to press Ctrl+C to stop them. So with a newer version you can simply use 'killall -INT' to send them SIGINT instead of SIGTERM, and they should exit cleanly.

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Here's a neat trick I discovered when I was faced with this problem Make a n empty file . It doesn't have to be a fifo pipe or anoything, then write 'q' to it when it's time to stop recording

1.$ touch stop 2.$ <./stop ffmpeg -i ... output.ext >/dev/null 2>>Capture.log & 3.$ wait for stopping time 4.$ echo 'q' > stop

ffmpeg stops as though it got 'q' from the terminal STDIN

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