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Having

val a: Map[String, (Int, Int)] = Map("a" -> (1, 10), "b" -> (2, 20))

what would be the right Scala way to derive

val b: (Map[String, Int], Map[String, Int]) = (Map("a" -> 1, "b" -> 2), Map("a" -> 10, "b" -> 20))

from a?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted
scala> val b = (a.mapValues(_._1), a.mapValues(_._2))
b: (scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int], scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int]) = (Map(a -> 1, b -> 2),Map(a -> 10, b -> 20))
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2  
Go simple I say. :) –  Sean Parsons Mar 15 '12 at 15:47
    
Wow, +1. Didn't think of this. :) –  missingfaktor Mar 15 '12 at 15:48

I like Sean's answer, but if you wanted, for some reason to traverse your map only once and didn't want to use Scalaz, here's another solution:

a.foldLeft((Map.empty[String, Int], Map.empty[String, Int])) {
  case ((a1, a2), (k, (v1, v2))) => (a1 + (k -> v1), a2 + (k -> v2))
}
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Have you got an idea why have somebody downvoted your suggestion? –  Ivan Mar 15 '12 at 17:05
    
@Ivan No clue, really. Have I upset somebody? –  romusz Mar 15 '12 at 17:12
    
I am curious may this mean there is a mistake... –  Ivan Mar 15 '12 at 17:53
    
@Ivan : I've tested the code - the result is exactly what you specified: (scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int], scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int]) = (Map(a -> 1, b -> 2),Map(a -> 10, b -> 20)) –  romusz Mar 15 '12 at 18:01
    
I see, but maybe something conceptual or hidden we don't understand... Or maybe just a bad-mooded guy have wandered through... :-) Whatever, thank you for participating. –  Ivan Mar 15 '12 at 18:05
import scalaz._
import Scalaz._

scala> val m = Map("a" -> (1, 10), "b" -> (2, 20))
m: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,(Int, Int)] = Map(a -> (1,10), b -> (2,20))

scala> val (a, b) = m.toSeq foldMap { case (k, (v1, v2)) => (Map(k -> v1), Map(k -> v2)) }
a: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(b -> 2, a -> 1)
b: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(b -> 20, a -> 10)
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Thank you too. @sean-parsons answer is definitely better readable, but I am going to try your way too to chack if it is more memory/cpu-efficient. And it is nice to know. –  Ivan Mar 15 '12 at 15:56
2  
It certainly is more expensive. Much more object creation, and indirection. What Sean suggested is both more succinct and more performant. –  missingfaktor Mar 15 '12 at 16:07
    
Thanks. Good to know anyway. –  Ivan Mar 15 '12 at 17:06
2  
@Dowvoters, Y U NO COMMENT? –  missingfaktor Mar 15 '12 at 19:09
    
Looks like we've got some vote-trolls here... –  Ivan Mar 15 '12 at 19:38

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