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This has been very puzzling, hopefully someone can enlighten me. I have a stored proc that returns expected (to me at least) results when I run it from SSMS and it returns unexpected results when I run it from a SQL Job. The server is running SQL Server 2005, not sure about sp version. I can get this if it helps.

When I run the code below from SSMS, only one record, Mon, Mar 05:, contains 'True' for InsufficientSampleSize, as I expect.

When I run the same code from a SQL Job, all records contain 'True' for InsufficientSampleSize, which is unexpected.

Is there something wrong with how I'm evaluating the d.ScoreCount value? Maybe it's a db setting like ANSI_NULLS that is different when I run the procedure using a Job? My data doesn't contain any nulls, at this time, so I don't think it's ANSI_NULLS.

Thanks in advance. I've tried rewriting this logic a few times and I still encounter this issue.

create table #tmpScoreData (EventDate datetime, Score int)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120302', 4)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120302', 7)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120302', 7)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120302', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120302', 7)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120303', 9)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120303', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120303', 4)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120303', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120303', 5)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120304', 8)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120304', 8)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120304', 7)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120304', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120304', 5)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120305', 7)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120305', 6)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120305', 2)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120306', 7)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120306', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120306', 4)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120306', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120306', 5)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120307', 5)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120307', 2)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120307', 8)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120307', 7)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120307', 5)

insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120308', 9)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120308', 4)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120308', 8)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120308', 3)
insert into #tmpScoreData values('20120308', 5)

declare @weekEnding datetime
set @weekEnding = '20120308'

select EventDate = cd.WeekDayAbbr + ', ' + substring(convert(varchar(10), cd.CalendarDate, 107), 1, 6) + ':',
    AvgScore = d.Score,
    InsufficientSampleSize = case when isnull(d.ScoreCount, 0) < 5 then 'True' end,
    WeekEnding = @weekEnding
from (select 1 as ID, 'Fri' as WeekDayAbbr, @weekEnding - 6 as CalendarDate
    union
    select 2, 'Sat', @weekEnding - 5
    union
    select 3, 'Sun', @weekEnding - 4
    union
    select 4, 'Mon', @weekEnding - 3
    union
    select 5, 'Tue', @weekEnding - 2
    union
    select 6, 'Wed', @weekEnding - 1
    union
    select 7, 'Thu', @weekEnding) as cd
left join (select EventDate,
                avg(convert(decimal(9,4), Score)) as Score,
                count(Score) as ScoreCount
           from #tmpScoreData
          where EventDate <= @weekEnding
            and EventDate > @weekEnding - 7
          group by EventDate) as d on cd.CalendarDate = d.EventDate
order by cd.ID

drop table #tmpScoreData

I updated the dates to less ambiguous values. In my actual stored proc, the dates are in an exising table as datetime values. So, this isn't the cause of my issue. Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

It's possible that your dates are being interpretted differently. Does '3/8/2012' mean 3rd August or 8th March?

To avoid the ambiguity, don't just use strings and implicit conversions. Instead use strings and explicit conversions...

CONVERT(DATETIME, '3/8/2012', 103)  -- Or whichever format is relevant

See CAST and CONVERT (Transact-SQL) for the formats you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Or better yet strings that can't be misinterpreted by anyone, e.g. '20120308'... –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 15 '12 at 15:52
    
@AaronBertrand - I thought it was only universal if it also included the time part? And although it can't be mis-interpretted by the database engine, many humans will still mis-interpret dates unless they have a prompt to check the format. –  MatBailie Mar 15 '12 at 15:55
    
Nope, not true. Even 'yyyy-mm-dd' is not universal without 'Thh:mm...'. 'yyyymmdd' is the only date-only format that I know of that is universal and cannot be misinterpreted based on language, dateformat or regional settings. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 15 '12 at 15:59
    
For display I much prefer 'yyyy-mm-dd' over 'yyyymmdd' just for readability - unless the audience is in France, where they allegedly think it should be 'yyyy-dd-mm'... –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 15 '12 at 16:00
    
@AaronBertrand - Mental note to self - 'yyyymmdd' is universal, don't need to keep adding T00:00:00.000 Yey!!! :) –  MatBailie Mar 15 '12 at 16:01

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