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I'm working on a machine simulation program. I've got a vector of bitsets for main memory, so that I may use a pointer to this vector, pMemory->at(i), to access any specific "word". I really do prefer the vector-of-bitsets design, and I'm sticking with it (this program is due in... about 6 hours, eek!)

I've been having some trouble trying to figure out how to get bitsets in and out of different locations (simulated registers and other memory locations, etc), so I've read up some on using streams. I've come up with this:

#include <bitset>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{


    /** demonstrating use of stringstream to/from bitset **/
    {
        bitset<12> sourceBits(std::string("011010010100"));
        bitset<12> targetBits(0);

        stringstream iBits(stringstream::in | stringstream::out);

        iBits << sourceBits.to_string();
        cout << targetBits << endl;
        iBits >> targetBits;
        cout << targetBits << endl;
    } //end stringstream to/from bitset

    return 0;
}

So, this works, and I can adapt this technique to fit my program.

My questions are, is this a good idea? Is there something fundamental I'm missing about using the bitset >> and << operators? Is it really necessary to do all this manual wrangling?

Also, tangentially, what should I do when copying a 12-bit bitset into a 16-bit bitset?

Thank you, stackoverflow! This is my first question to this community after much googling. I appreciate everyone's insights!

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+1 for a useful demonstration program. –  Robᵩ Mar 15 '12 at 16:30
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are overthinking the problem. To copy the value of one bitset to another, use the assignment operator.

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>
int main () {
  std::bitset<12> sourceBits(std::string("011010010100"));
  std::bitset<12> targetBits(0);

  targetBits = sourceBits;

  std::cout << targetBits << "\n";
}


Your tangential question is answered by bitset::to_ulong:

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>

int main () {
  std::bitset<12> sourceBits(std::string("011010010100"));

  std::bitset<16> sixteen;
  sixteen = sourceBits.to_ulong();
  std::cout << sixteen << "\n";
}
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Overthinking indeed. Thank you for that, it compiled and ran exactly as expected. –  absterge Mar 15 '12 at 16:43
    
You are welcome. Welcome to StackOverflow! Don't forget to accept my answer (click the checkmark). After you've turned in your assignment, look around for questions that you can answer! –  Robᵩ Mar 15 '12 at 16:45
    
So now I have another question: the method in which I'm using this 12-to-16 conversion takes a pointer to a bitset<16> and assigns it the value from another word (an int), pMAR = pMemory->at(wordAddr).to_ulong();. Compiling now gives me the error "invalid conversion from 'long unsigned int' to 'std::bitset<16u>*' [-fpermissive]". Should I open another question for this issue? –  absterge Mar 15 '12 at 16:52
    
... ugh, I think I just figured it out - I forgot my *. It should be *pmar = blah blah. Gotta deref that pointer! –  absterge Mar 15 '12 at 17:06
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