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There are myriad of optins in the scipy clustering module, and I'd like to be sure that I'm using them correctly. I have a symmetric distance matrix DR and I'd like to find all clusters such that any point in the cluster has a neighbor with a distance of no more than 1.2.

L = linkage(DR,method='single')
F = fcluster(L, 1.2)

In linkage, I'm pretty sure single is what I want (the Nearest Point Algorithm). However for fcluster, I think I want the default, ‘inconsistent’, method:

‘inconsistent’: If a cluster node and all its descendants have an inconsistent value less than or equal to t then all its leaf descendants belong to the same flat cluster. When no non-singleton cluster meets this criterion, every node is assigned to its own cluster. (Default)

But maybe it's the ‘distance’ method:

‘distance’: Forms flat clusters so that the original observations in each flat cluster have no greater a cophenetic distance than t.

... I'm not sure. Which one to use? What does cophenetic distance distance mean in this context?

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You might want to look at DBSCAN. See the Wikipedia article on it. It looks like you are looking for an output of DBSCAN with minPts=1 and epsilon=1.2 – Anony-Mousse Mar 15 '12 at 19:50
    
@Anony-Mousse looking it over on wikipedia, it seems that DBSCAN is exactly what I'm talking about. The question can now be phrased: Is DBSCAN implemented in scipy? – Hooked Mar 15 '12 at 19:59
    
It's fairly simple to implement judging from the pseudocode on wikipedia, in particular since you already seem to have a distance matrix. Just do it yourself. – Anony-Mousse Mar 15 '12 at 20:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might want to look at DBSCAN. See the Wikipedia article on it. It looks like you are looking for an output of DBSCAN with minPts=1 and epsilon=1.2

It's fairly simple to implement judging from the pseudocode on wikipedia, in particular since you already seem to have a distance matrix. Just do it yourself.

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One would want to have a look at how others did it. My implementation: bitbucket.org/jgehrcke/python_molecular_structure_comparison/… and scikit-learn's implementation: github.com/scikit-learn/scikit-learn/blob/master/sklearn/… – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Apr 2 '14 at 13:49
    
There is a somewhat official implementation of DBSCAN available in ELKI. It supports two dozens of similarity measures, has full indexing support for acceleration, and there are also enhanced algorithms such as OPTICS, PreDeCon etc. available. I'd start with this implementation. – Anony-Mousse Apr 2 '14 at 14:22
    
Right you are, ELKI is a framework written by the original authors of DBSCAN (and other algorithms), but ELKI is not exactly Python :-) – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Apr 2 '14 at 17:40

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