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At work for a specific case we are using:

context.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory().autowireBeanProperties(
   serializer, AutowireCapableBeanFactory.AUTOWIRE_BY_NAME, false
);

Today i had to autowire a value on my serializer bean which is provided by a FactoryBean.

My first try was just to use the simple factorybean id but it didn't work.

After that i tried many solutions i read here, using @Resource, @Autowired, @Qualifier etc...

Finally after looking how the bean injection was working, i found out that Spring never inject "simple properties"

/**
 * Return an array of non-simple bean properties that are unsatisfied.
 * These are probably unsatisfied references to other beans in the
 * factory. Does not include simple properties like primitives or Strings.
 * @param mbd the merged bean definition the bean was created with
 * @param bw the BeanWrapper the bean was created with
 * @return an array of bean property names
 * @see org.springframework.beans.BeanUtils#isSimpleProperty
 */
protected String[] unsatisfiedNonSimpleProperties(AbstractBeanDefinition mbd, BeanWrapper bw) {
    Set<String> result = new TreeSet<String>();
    PropertyValues pvs = mbd.getPropertyValues();
    PropertyDescriptor[] pds = bw.getPropertyDescriptors();
    for (PropertyDescriptor pd : pds) {
        if (pd.getWriteMethod() != null && !isExcludedFromDependencyCheck(pd) && !pvs.contains(pd.getName()) &&
                !BeanUtils.isSimpleProperty(pd.getPropertyType())) {
            result.add(pd.getName());
        }
    }
    return StringUtils.toStringArray(result);
}

I also found in the Spring documentation:

Please also note that it is not currently possible to autowire so-called simple properties such as primitives, Strings, and Classes (and arrays of such simple properties). (This is by-design and should be considered a feature.)

Finally i know why my factory bean can't inject in my property: the bean to inject is an Enum which is a "simple property" (according to the code)

I just wonder why, by design, it is forbidden to autowire simple properties, particularly in the case of a simple property injected by a FactoryBean.

Also, i see how autowiring a String by Type could be a problem, but autowiring it by name, what's the matter?

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2 Answers

You should be able to achieve what you need with springEL:

class MyClass {
  @Value("#{factoryBeanName}")
  private int myValue;
  ...
}

actually I'm not 100% sure this will work exactly as above but you get the idea, you may try #{myBean.someMethod()} instead.

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Well, consider the case where there are multiple "beans" of the same (primitive) type in the context. How could Spring possibly figure out which one to inject?

This is basically the same situation Spring has with autowiring anything, but it's far more likely that there are multiple instances of String or Integer in a spring context, then there are instances of com.yourcorp.SomeClass. In fact, if you enumerate the beans in your spring context you will see that there are almost always multiple instances of String in it.

I'm guessing that the Spring developers just decided that there was more trouble than benefit in the feature, since it nearly always won't work anyway.

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Check the last line of my question. Autowiring by name should be able to work since xml wiring for simple types, by name, works... –  Sebastien Lorber Mar 15 '12 at 17:28
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