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I have a class Logger with a number of static methods for various user activity logging. Something like:

public static class Logger
{
    public static void FileDownload(int fileId, int userId) 
    {
        // Do stuff
    }

    // ... and a number of similar additional methods
}

So what I've come to now is that I want to ignore logging the activity for users of a certain role.

The idea I had, to avoid rewriting a lot of code and for the purpose of DRY, was to implement a custom attribute that I can use on the Logger class, which will, for every method call, verify if the user is in a certain role, and in that case I want to ignore the method call altogether.

The problem I can't wrap my head around is how to intercept and abort the method-call within my attribute.

Is it possible, or is there some other more efficient way to intercept a method call and ignore it if a certain condition is true?

share|improve this question
    
No, C# provides no mechanism for ad-hoc method interception a la AOP. –  Kirk Woll Mar 15 '12 at 17:04
    
This looks like a very similar question/answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/4502134/… –  gymbrall Mar 15 '12 at 17:06
    
@gymbrall It does indeed, don't know how I missed it, been searching around SO for a while. Thanks! –  Christofer Eliasson Mar 15 '12 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A way to do this efficiently and DRY is to change those methods from static to instance methods, then inherit from class Logger and override its methods to do nothing.

Your Logger class will now look like this:

public class Logger
{
    public virtual void FileDownload(int fileId, int userId) 
    {
        // Do stuff
    }
    // ... and a number of similar additional methods
}

And the subclass will look like this:

public class IdleLogger : Logger
{
    public override void FileDownload(int fileId, int userId) 
    {
        // Do NOTHING
    }
    // ... and a number of similar additional methods
}

Then you can say:

var myLogger =  IsUserInNoLoggingRole  ? new IdleLogger() : new Logger();

...and you are done! Simple, efficient, DRY and elegant.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1: setting logger per-request based on user. May be useful to cache in HttpContext.Current.Items or use dependency injection container that can be configured to return different instances per-request. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 15 '12 at 17:18
1  
I like this approach. I guess I could instantiate the logger and keep it in my SecurityContext for simplicity. –  Christofer Eliasson Mar 15 '12 at 17:27
    
in multi user environment which is the case here, will this approach not create more (than required) instances of logger? or have I missed the obvious? –  Krishna Mar 16 '12 at 7:51

in general your logging should be complete, it is upto the reporting application that would need to decide to show the activity based on user types. that said, however (and I am sure you have valid reason to do "if then else") this can be achieved by creating a common logging method (logMessage)

int t = User.LogRequired? logMessage(<parameters here>) : 0;
share|improve this answer

Why not to simply check before actually logging anything?

public static class Logger
{
 public void LogSensetiveInformation(string message)
 {
  if (!AllowedLogging(HttpContext.Current)
  {
    return;
  }

  LogMessage(message);// write message to some storage

 }
 public void Log(string message)
 {
  LogMessage(message);// write message to some storage
 }
}

This way you don't need to annotate code in any special way (which probably not possible anyway since the same methods are likely to be used by all kinds of users).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! The reason I wanted to use an attribute or similar was so that I didn't have to do the check within every method. –  Christofer Eliasson Mar 15 '12 at 17:38
    
You only need to add checks to your logger itself, you regular code will stay the same. Also I like Diego's answer more as more generic. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 15 '12 at 18:35

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