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I was using console.log() in some JavaScript I wrote and an error of: console is not defined was thrown in Internet Explorer (worked fine in other browsers).

I have replaced it with:

if (console) console.log("...");

If console is undefined, I would expect the condition to evaluate as false. Ergo, the statement console.log wouldn't be executed and shouldn't throw an error.

Instead, an error of: console is not defined at character 4 is thrown.

Is this a IE bug? Or is that "if" condition really illegal? It seems absurd because if if (console) is illegal, then if (console==undefined) should be illegal too.

How are you supposed to check for undefined variables?

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Clear your cache? –  zzzzBov Mar 15 '12 at 17:37
11  
console doesn't exist in IE unless the console is actually open. –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 15 '12 at 17:38
    
BTW you may have some another console object, hence foolproof solution would be to check that console.log exists and is a function. –  kirilloid Mar 15 '12 at 17:41
1  
possible duplicate of 'console' is undefined error for internet explorer –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 15 '12 at 17:41
2  
Did I really write "Ergo"??? Or is that what @Matt McDonald edited? –  matteo Apr 24 '12 at 21:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 18 down vote accepted

If console itself doesn't exist at all, it throws an error because you're accessing an undefined variable. Just like if(abc) {} throws an error.

Since console resides in window, and window does always exist, this should work:

if(window.console) ...

Basically, accessing an property that doesn't exist is free and doesn't throw an error (it just evaluates to undefined, failing the if condition). However, it is illegal to access an undeclared variable.

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if ('console' in window) will work as well –  kirilloid Mar 15 '12 at 17:39
    
I prefer if('console' in window), but both work –  tkone Mar 15 '12 at 17:40
1  
You can also do: if( typeof console === 'undefined') –  levi Mar 15 '12 at 17:40
    
Honestly I find this one more succint... But they shouldn't have any differences (apart from what they exactly evaluate to). –  pimvdb Mar 15 '12 at 17:41
    
Any reason not to close as a dupe of this? Same question, same answer. –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 15 '12 at 17:45

Other answers gave you the root cause. However, there's a better solution than using if before any call to console.*

Add this (once) before including any of your scripts that use console:

//Ensures there will be no 'console is undefined' errors
window.console = window.console || (function(){
    var c = {}; c.log = c.warn = c.debug = c.info = c.error = c.time = c.dir = c.profile = c.clear = c.exception = c.trace = c.assert = function(s){};
    return c;
})();

This will create a 'pseudo' console only if it doesn't exist, so that 'console is undefined' errors will go away and you won't have to ask if console exists everytime. With this, you just call console.log or any console method anywhere, without problems.

Hope this helps. Cheers

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1  
I made an edit above - use a parameter (I chose the name logMsg arbitrarily) in the function signature to be consistent since you will be passing something to be printed to the log. This also avoids any intellisense errors in a JS enabled IDE –  Flak DiNenno Feb 4 '13 at 23:17
    
@Edgar Excellent answer thank you very much..... +1 for the answer –  Jitesh Tukadiya Mar 19 '13 at 12:03
    
Glad it helped you :) –  Edgar Villegas Alvarado May 28 '13 at 4:37

in internet explorer the console object is not actually defined unless your developer tools are open at the time the window loads.

to fix your problem, wrap all your console prints in an if statement:

if (typeof window.console !== 'undefined') {
    ...
}

you also need to refresh each page after you open the developer tools in order to see the console prints. <3 IE

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This is a funny thing about undeclared variables. The JS engine tries to resolve the variable to a property of window. So usually, foo == window.foo.

But, if that property does not exist, it throws an error.

alert(foo); // Syntax error: foo is not defined

(Should be "foo is not declared" imho, but whatever.) That error does not occur when you explicitly reference the window's property:

alert(window.foo); // undefined

...or declare that variable:

var foo;
alert(foo); // undefined

...or use it for initialization:

foo = 1; // window.foo = 1

The strange thing is that the typeof operator also prevents this error:

alert(typeof foo); // "undefined"

So, to sum things up: You cannot use undeclared variables in expressions unless there's a property of window with the same name, or you use it as an operand of typeof. In your example, window.console does not exist, and there's no var declaration. That's why you get an error.

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How about this? Haven't tried it though

if (typeof console == "undefined" || typeof console.log == "undefined") var console = { log: function() {} };
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This is evil. ;) –  sjas Oct 15 '13 at 12:10

You can use the below to give an extra degree of insurance that you've got all bases covered. Using typeof first will avoid any undefined errors. Using === will also ensure that the name of the type is actually the string "undefined". Finally, you'll want to add a parameter to the function signature (I chose logMsg arbitrarily) to ensure consistency, since you do pass whatever you want printed to the console to the log function. This also keep you intellisense accurate and avoids any warnings/errors in your JS aware IDE.

if(!window.console || typeof console === "undefined") {
  var console = { log: function (logMsg) { } };
}
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Inspired by @Edgar Villegas Alvarado answer, completed the methods and made it a bit simpler:

(function(w){
  var c = 'assert,clear,count,debug,dir,dirxml,error,exception,group,groupCollapsed,groupEnd,info,log,markTimeline,profile,profileEnd,table,time,timeEnd,timeStamp,trace,warn'.split(','),
  noop = function () {};

  w.console = w.console || (function (len) {
    var ret = {};
    while (len--) { ret[c[len]] = noop; }
    return ret;
  }(c.length));
})(window);

Edited to put into an IIFE and fix a syntax error!

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Edit of @yckart's answer

Using c.length as input to a function which defines c won't work. Also you're just reassigning items in the array with noop when you should be adding methods to window.console.

(function(w){
  var c = 'assert,clear,count,debug,dir,dirxml,error,exception,group,groupCollapsed,groupEnd,info,log,markTimeline,profile,profileEnd,table,time,timeEnd,timeStamp,trace,warn'.split(','),
  noop = function () {};

  w.console = w.console || (function (len) {
    var ret = {};
    while (len--) { ret[c[len]] = noop; }
    return ret;
  }(c.length));
})(window);
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