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Here is code which compare s2 with s1, if they are the same it returns 0 and some other options, but while loop is not end-able and I can not find its problem, the only thing I know if I convert char* s2 into const char* s2 it will work fine.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int cmp(char*,char*);
int main()
{
    char* s1;
    cout << "Please Enter First Word: "; cin >> s1;
    char* s2;
    cout << "Please Enter Second Word: "; cin >> s2;
    cout << "The Result is: " << cmp(s1,s2) << endl;
       return 0;
}

int cmp(char* s1, char* s2)
{
    int i=0;
    while (*(s2+i)!=0)
    {
        if (*(s2+i)>*(s1+i)) return 1;
        if (*(s2+i)<*(s1+i)) return -1;
        i++;
    }
    return 0;
}
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2  
Why don't you use strcmp which is standard, and equivalent to your cmp? And std::string has compare also... –  Basile Starynkevitch Mar 15 '12 at 18:17
1  
You are using s1 and s2 before initializing them to a sensible value. –  David Schwartz Mar 15 '12 at 18:18
5  
This is probably the most common mistake I see in C and C++ code on SO. Unfortunately it's hard to search for if you don't already know what the problem is. –  Ed S. Mar 15 '12 at 18:18
1  
@Stranger what is your question. or where you're getting wrong? –  EAGER_STUDENT Mar 15 '12 at 18:20
1  
If you compile with -Wall you'd likely get some helpful warnings. –  bernie Mar 15 '12 at 18:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Consider:

char* s1;
cout << "Please Enter First Word: "; cin >> s1;

How big is s1 ? The problem is that your char pointers doesn't point to any memory block. You need to allocate memory with new.

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You have undefined behaviour. You aren't allocating any space to store the string (you're not initialising s1 or s2 to point at any memory).

I suggest using std::string instead; it manages its own memory issues.

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As above said by Oli and karlphillip, your code must allocate memory for strings.

And the compare function can be like....

int cmp(char* s1, char* s2) 
{ 
    int i=0; 

    while ( *(s1+i)!=0 & *(s2+i)!=0 ) 
    { 
        if (*(s2+i)>*(s1+i)) return 1; 
        if (*(s2+i)<*(s1+i)) return -1; 
        i++; 
    } 
    if(*(s1+i)==0 & *(s2+i)==0 )
     return 0;
    else if (*(s1+i)!=0)
     return -1;
    else
     return 1;
} 

Because, your cmp function will return 0 whenever your str1 is greater in length that str2 and str1 is identical to str2 upto str2's length.

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