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I though it would be nice to learn how to make a code with "?:" in C++ that first increases number, when it reaches 100, it decreases, when it reaches 0, it increases again.

Ok so to clarify: Start number: 1, should write 1 - 100, then at 100, 100, 99, 98, 97 to 0, and so on.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main () {
int number = 1;
string sign = "plus";
for (int i = 700; i > 0; i--) {
    (number==0?sign="plus":(number==100?sign="minus":(sign=="plus"?number++:number--)));
    cout << number;
    usleep(3000);
}
}

WELL! it sure isnt easy. (Code above does not work, give error: cannot convert char to int)

THE QUESTION: It doesnt work, how to make it work?

This is not a homework..

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2  
Is there a question here? –  ildjarn Mar 15 '12 at 18:29
1  
Here's an idea: if you don't know what the effect of ++ and -- will be and you have to ask on Stack Overflow, stop using it! Just write a regular if statement; it's guaranteed to work and everyone will understand it. –  Nicol Bolas Mar 15 '12 at 18:34
    
Hmmmmmm but I wanted to use a short code with "?:" to rotate a cube later on.. And I want it to be short. –  user1272320 Mar 15 '12 at 18:35
1  
"how to make it work" [in one expression] - I don't know. "should I make it work in one expression" - No. –  aschepler Mar 15 '12 at 18:39
1  
@user1272320 writing shorter length code never should be a reason to do anything. Writing understandable code with a specific purpose is a more noble goal. The compiler is going to replace and optimize your statements anyway and probably a lot better than your average developer. If longer compile times is a concern buy a better computer as that is infinitely less expensive than the cost of development time caused by "short code". –  AJG85 Mar 15 '12 at 18:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Many novice programmers assumes that the ternary operator ?: is just a short-hand if-statement, which is true in many cases (from the novice developers perspective). But there are limitations, and they are not at all the same thing..

The evaluated result of the ternary operator has to be the same Type (or convertible to one or the other) no matter if the statement tested is true or false.


#include <string>

int
main (int argc, char *argv)
{
  std::string s;
  0 == 0 ? s = "123": 123;
}

In this self-contained example (which fails to compile to easily prove my point) we get the following error;

foo.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)':
foo.cpp:7:23: error: no match for ternary 'operator?:' in 'true ? s.std::basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Alloc>::operator=<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >(((const char*)"123")) : 123'

This is because the expression will evalute to a std::string& if the statement is true, and an int if it's false. Two different types depending on which the evaluated expression is true or not? Not allowed.

The compiler therefore tries to implicitly convert either side so that a match can be found, but it couldn't find any suitable conversion and we get the error thrown in our face.


int
main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
  0 == 0 ? "123": 123;
}

The above snippet will generate a much nicer compile error than we had earlier (when trying to compile it will g++). And as stated in this post; both result operands of ?: needs to be of the same type.

foo.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)':
foo.cpp:4:19: error: operands to ?: have different types 'const char*' and 'int'
share|improve this answer
    
"Not allowed." Unless they're convertible to one another. –  Nicol Bolas Mar 15 '12 at 18:42
    
KK, so it returns something.. –  user1272320 Mar 15 '12 at 18:43
    
Many novice programmers assumes that the ternary operator ?: is just a short-hand if-statement, which is true in many cases No, it's never true. This construct is in fact the conditional operator, whose uses produces an expression. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 15 '12 at 18:54
    
@user1272320: No, functions return things. The operator evaluates to a value, like (almost) any other operator. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 15 '12 at 18:54
1  
@refp: i.e. "from an incorrect perspective". Abstraction and dumbing down is one thing; dangerous misleading by using opposite technical terms is quite another. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 15 '12 at 19:01

Your problem isn't with ++ and --. Your problem is your abuse of the ?: operator.

?: is not a replacement for an if statement. It is first and foremost an expression. Expressions evaluate to values, which have types. Since ?: can evaluate to two values, C++ requires that either both values are the same type or the second value is convertible to the first.

sign="minus" is an expression and it has a type. As does (sign=="plus"?number++:number--). But they're not the same type. And they're not convertible to one another. So C++ says that your code doesn't make sense.

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This is the correct answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 15 '12 at 18:56

Try this:

#include <iostream>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int number = 1;
    int direction = +1;
    for (int i = 700; i > 0; i --) {
        direction = direction > 0 
            ? (number < 100 ? +1 : -1)
            : (number > 0  ? -1 : +1);
        number += direction;
        std::cout << number << "\n";
    }
}
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Not using the ternary operator quite the way you're going for...

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    for(int i=0;i<700;++i)
        std::cout << (i/100%2?99-i%100:i%100+1) << ' ';
}

And not using it at all:

int main() {
    for(int i=0;i<700;++i)
        std::cout << abs((i+101)%200-100) << ' ';
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is here:

number==100 ? (sign="minus") : ( sign=="plus" ? number++ : number-- ) ;

and it's because, if the expression the conditional evaluates to is not used, the second statement will be promoted to the first one's type (or the other way around).

The first expression's type is std::string. The second one evaluates to int. The compiler tries to promote int to string and it obviously fails.

If you insist on keeping it like this, you can hack it a bit:

number==100 ? (sign="minus") : ( sign=="plus" ? (number++,"") : (number--,"") ) ;

I hope you don't.

Use if for this one.

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Hmm your hack didnt work, but I suppose I'll listen to your advise, aff. –  user1272320 Mar 15 '12 at 18:40
    
@user1272320 it does compile: ideone.com/L9sMk You also accepted an incorrect answer. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 15 '12 at 18:46
    
@LuchianGrigore It's not incorrect, and please see my comment and edits of the post in question. –  Filip Roséen - refp Mar 15 '12 at 19:01
    
@refp it was incorrect before the edit. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 15 '12 at 19:28
    
@LuchianGrigore according to me the answer was never incorrect, though on some levels I could agree with the fact that the wording was a bit misleading in places. But those misunderstandings would have gone away by reading the full post, since everything was there to begin with. Thanks for letting me know though.. –  Filip Roséen - refp Mar 15 '12 at 19:30

As others have told you, you are abusing the ?: operator. But worse than that, if you substitute your use of it with equivilent if statements, you will see that you also have logic errors as well:

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 

int main () { 
    int number = 1; 
    string sign = "plus"; 
    for (int i = 700; i > 0; i--) { 
        if (number==0) // <-- never happens!
            sign="plus";
        else {
            if (number==100) // <-- when number reaches 100, it stops being updated!
                sign="minus";
            else {
                if (sign=="plus")
                    number++;
                else
                    number--;
            }
        } 
        cout << number; // <-- counts to 100 and then keeps outputting 100
        usleep(3000); 
    } 
}

To fix that, you need logic that is more like the following instead:

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 

int main () { 
    int number = 1; 
    string sign = "plus"; 
    for (int i = 700; i > 0; i--) { 
        cout << number; 
        if (number==0)
            sign="plus";
        else if (number==100)
            sign="minus";
        if (sign=="plus")
            number++;
        else
            number--;
        usleep(3000); 
    } 
}
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