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I need to use a list monad transformer. I've read that there are potential problems with ListT IO from Control.Monad.List, since IO isn't commutative, so I'm looking at ListT done right. But I'm getting some unexpected behavior.

Consider this simple test:

test = runListT $ do
  x <- liftList [1..3]
  liftIO $ print x
  y <- liftList [6..8]
  liftIO $ print (x,y)

Using Control.Monad.List:

Main> test
1
(1,6)
(1,7)
(1,8)
2
(2,6)
(2,7)
(2,8)
3
(3,6)
(3,7)
(3,8)
[(),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),()]

Using "ListT done right":

Main> test
1
(1,6)

Is this a problem with "ListT done right", or am I just using it wrong? Is there a preferred alternative?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This might be intensional on the part of the author, since they say

it lets each element of the list have its own side effects, which only get `excecuted' if this element of the list is really inspected.

I'm not sure, though. Anyway, you can use this function to sequence the whole list:

runAll_ :: (Monad m) => ListT m a -> m ()
runAll_ (ListT m) = runAll_' m where
    runAll_' m = do
        mm <- m
        case mm of
             MNil          -> return ()
             _ `MCons` mxs -> runAll_' mxs

And an analogous runAll that returns a list should be easy to construct.

main = runAll_ $ do
    x <- liftList [1..3]
    liftIO $ print x
    y <- liftList [6..8]
    liftIO $ print (x,y)

1
(1,6)
(1,7)
(1,8)
2
(2,6)
(2,7)
(2,8)
3
(3,6)
(3,7)
(3,8)
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Hmm, ok this makes sense, and your runAll_ idea is quite nice! I was expecting behavior similar to nested for loops with print statements in an imperative language. But if "ListT done right" is lazy, why is it still performing side effects for the heads of the lists? –  Chad Scherrer Mar 15 '12 at 19:49
    
It's assuming you always want at least the first element, so it wraps the "whole list" in m, and also wraps the cdr in m; the car is not wrapped. If you sequence the "whole list", it exposes just the car. –  Owen Mar 15 '12 at 19:52
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