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I'm trying to draw an arbitrary object with "n" number of textures (6 in the examples), and each face has a single (but possibly different) texture.

When using a single texture, it all works fine, but I'm having a hard time making 2D texture arrays to work.

Here's the object:

struct Vertex3f { float x, y, z; };
struct ObjectVertexfMT { // MT stands for Multi Texture
    struct Vertex3f coord;
    struct Vertex3f texcoord;
    struct Vertex3f normal;
};
struct ObjectVertexfMT GLEngine_CubeMT[] = {
    //    x,     y,     v,    u,    v,    r,    nx,    ny,    nz
    // Front
    { -1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f },
    {  1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f },
    {  1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f },
    { -1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f },
    // Back
    { -1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f },
    {  1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f },
    {  1.0f,  1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f },
    { -1.0f,  1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f },
    // Top
    { -1.0f,  1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 2.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f },
    { -1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 2.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 2.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f,  1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 2.0f,  0.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f },
    // Bottom
    { -1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 3.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f },
    { -1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 3.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 3.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 3.0f,  0.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f },
    // Right
    {  1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 4.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f,  1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 4.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 4.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    {  1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 4.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    // Left
    { -1.0f, -1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 5.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    { -1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 5.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    { -1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 5.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f },
    { -1.0f,  1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 5.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f,  0.0f }
};

note that the "r" parameter is different for each quad (indicating the index of the texture that I want in that specific quad).

I'm registering the textures like so:

struct texInfo {
    int width, height;
    unsigned char *data;
};

// Loads texture from filename in a texInfo structure -- always 32 bit depth
struct texInfo *loadTexture(const char* filename);

unsigned int register3DTexture(const char *filenames[], unsigned int texcount) {
  unsigned int ret;
  unsigned int i;
  struct texInfo *tex;
  glGenTextures(1, &ret);
  glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, ret);
  glTexImage3D(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, 0, 4, 256, 256, 6, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, NULL);
  for (i = 0; i < texcount; i++) {
    tex = loadTexture(filenames[i]);
    glTexSubImage3D(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, 0, 0, 0, i, tex->width, tex->height, 1, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, tex->data);
    free(tex);
  }

  return(ret);
}

...and then I draw:

  glPushMatrix();

  glClientActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
  glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, textures[0]); // Same behaviour if I change to GL_TEXTURE_2D

  glTranslatef(pos.x, pos.y, pos.z);
  glRotatef(rot_angle, rot.x, rot.y, rot.z);

  glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, VobObject[0]);
  glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, VobObject[1]);

  glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
  glEnableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);

  glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(struct ObjectVertexfMT), 0);
  glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT, sizeof(struct ObjectVertexfMT), (void*)(sizeof(float) * 6));

  // Textures
  glClientActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
  glEnableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);
  glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(struct ObjectVertexfMT), (void*)(sizeof(float) * 3));

  glDrawElements(GL_QUADS, m_vertexcount, GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, 0);

  glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
  glDisableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
  glPopMatrix();

The object is correctly drawn, but with no textures.

Another few questions:

  • Assuming it works, is this the best way to achieve my goal?

  • Can the "subtextures" have different dimensions of the "main" texture (the parameters of width and height on glTexImage3D() may be different from the ones from glTexSubImage3D())?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You must use a shader to use array textures. You can't use them with fixed-function rendering.

Can the "subtextures" have different dimensions of the "main" texture (the parameters of width and height on glTexImage3D() may be different from the ones from glTexSubImage3D())?

This question is confused. Just as with C++ arrays, the elements of texture arrays are all the same. If you have an array of int[30] in C++, then every element will be 30 integers in size. The same goes for array textures. The 2D array texture as a whole has a width and height, which is the same for all of the textures in the array.

glTexSubImage3D (and similar functions) does not affect the dimensions of the texture. All it does is upload pixel data to a location in the texture. Only glTexImage3D (and similar functions) affect the dimensions of the texture.

share|improve this answer
    
So... It is not possible to use VBO with GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY at all, right? Now I'll need a tutorial on shaders... –  Sergio Moura Mar 16 '12 at 12:15
    
@SergioMoura: Buffer objects and shaders have nothing to do with each other. You can use buffer objects with fixed-function rendering. You can use shaders with client-side vertex arrays. The only time they interact is when you're using buffer objects as source data for various shader-related activities (providing attributes, uniforms, transform feedback, etc). –  Nicol Bolas Mar 16 '12 at 17:22

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