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I need to find a list of prefixes of words inside a target string (I would like to have the list of matching indexes in the target string handled as an array).

  • I think using regex should be the cleanest way.
  • Given that I am looking for the pattern "foo", I would like to retrieve in the target string words like "foo", "Foo", "fooing", "Fooing"
  • Given that I am looking for the pattern "foo bar", I would like to retrieve in the target string patterns like "foo bar", "Foo bar", "foo Bar", "foo baring" (they are still all handled as prefixes, am I right?)

At the moment, after running it in different scenarios, my Python code still does not work.

  • I am assuming I have to use ^ to match the beginning of a word in a target string (i.e. a prefix).
  • I am assuming I have to use something like ^[fF] to be case insensitive with the first letter of my prefix.
  • I am assuming I should use something like ".*" to let the regexp behave like a prefix.
  • I am assuming I should use the \prefix1|prefix2|prefix3** to put in **logic OR many different prefixes in the pattern to search.

The following source code does not work because I am wrongly setting the txt_pattern.

import re

#              '            '           '            '                     '             '           '
txt_str = "edb foooooo jkds Fooooooo kj fooing jdcnj Fooing ujndn ggng sxk foo baring sh foo Bar djw Foo";
txt_pattern = ''#???

out_obj = re.match(txt_pattern,txt_str)
if out_obj:
   print "match!"
else:
   print "No match!"
  1. What am I missing?

  2. How should I set the txt_pattern?

  3. Can you please suggest me a good tutorial with minimum working examples? At the moment the standard tutorials from the first page of a Google search are very long and detailed, and not so simple to understand.

Thanks!

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Are you trying to match each word from the string separately? Seems like you should split the string and then iteratively try to match each word. –  chrisaycock Mar 15 '12 at 19:01
    
If you are searching for "foo bar" should it match "fooing bar"? –  Mark Byers Mar 15 '12 at 19:03
    
I think your text_pattern is an empty string (if I'm reading it right) - could that be why you're not matching anything? –  Code Jockey Mar 15 '12 at 19:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Regex is the wrong approach. First parse your string into a list of strings with one word per item. Then use a list comprehension with a filter. The split method on strings is a good way to get the list of words, then you can simply do [item for item in wordlist if item.startswith("foo")]

People spend ages hacking up inefficient code using convoluted regexes when all they need is a few string methods like split, partition, startswith and some pythonic list comprehensions or generators.

Regexes have their uses but simple string parsing is not one of them.

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I am assuming I have to use ^ to match the beginning of a word in a target string (i.e. a prefix).

No, the ^ is an anchor that only matches the start of the string. You can use \b instead, meaning a word boundary (but remember to escape the backslash inside a string literal, or use a raw string literal).

You will also have to use re.search instead of re.match because the latter only checks the start of the string, whereas the former searches for matches anywhere in the string.

share|improve this answer
>>> s = 'Foooooo jkds Fooooooo kj fooing jdcnj Fooing ujndn ggng sxk foo baring sh foo Bar djw Foo'
>>> regex = '((?i)(foo)(\w+)?)'
>>> compiled = re.compile(regex)
>>> re.findall(compiled, s)
[('Foooooo', 'Foo', 'oooo'), ('Fooooooo', 'Foo', 'ooooo'), ('fooing', 'foo', 'ing'), ('Fooing', 'Foo', 'ing'), ('foo', 'foo', ''), ('foo', 'foo', ''), ('Foo', 'Foo', '')]

(?i) -> case insensitive
(foo) -> group1 matches foo
(\w+) -> group2 matches every other word character

>>> print [i[0] for i in re.findall(compiled, s)]
['Foooooo', 'Fooooooo', 'fooing', 'Fooing', 'foo', 'foo', 'Foo']
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Try using this tool to test some stuff: http://www.pythonregex.com/

Use this reference: docs.python.org/howto/regex.html

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I would use something like this for your regex:

\b(?:([Ff]oo [Bb]ar)|([Ff]oo))\w*

Inside of the non-capturing group you should separate each prefix with a |, I also placed each prefix inside of its own capturing group so you can tell which prefix a given string matched, for example:

for match in re.finditer(r'\b(?:([Ff]oo [Bb]ar)|([Ff]oo))\w*', txt_str):
    n = 1
    while not match.group(n):
        n += 1
    print "Prefix %d matched '%s'" % (n, match.group(0))

Output:

Prefix 2 matched 'foooooo'
Prefix 2 matched 'Fooooooo'
Prefix 2 matched 'fooing'
Prefix 2 matched 'Fooing'
Prefix 1 matched 'foo baring'
Prefix 1 matched 'foo Bar'
Prefix 2 matched 'Foo'

Make sure you put longer prefixes first, if you were to put the foo prefix before the foo bar prefix, you would only match 'foo' in 'foo bar'.

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