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I would like to know how do I declare a record, that has some fixed values. I need to send data using this pattern: Byte($FF)-Byte(0..250)-Byte(0..250). I am using record for that and I would like to have the first value of it constant, so that it can't be messed up. Such as:

TPacket = record
  InitByte: byte; // =255, constant
  FirstVal,
  SecondVal: byte;
end;
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3  
You could resort to subrange types –  OnTheFly Mar 15 '12 at 19:03
    
If all you're doing is BYTE values in a TPacket, I would instead use RawByteString and just define constants named InitByte=0, FIrstVal=1, and so on. ANd I would ensure that the initial value was the correct constant value by doing it in CODE in my PacketBuild function. –  Warren P Mar 15 '12 at 20:38
1  
What Delphi version will you use? –  kobik Mar 15 '12 at 22:48
    
I will use XE2. –  Martin Melka Mar 16 '12 at 9:44
    
What do you mean by "send data using this pattern"? Do you intend to use TStream.Write(Packet,SizeOf(Packet)) or similar? If not, why does it have to be a record? –  Henrick Hellström Mar 16 '12 at 11:56
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't rely on a constructor because, contrary to Classes, Records are not required to use them, the default parameterless constructor being used implicitly.

But you can use a constant field:

type
  TPacket = record
   type
     TBytish = 0..250;
   const
     InitByte : Byte = 255;
   var
     FirstVal,
     SecondVal: TBytish;
  end;

Then use this as a regular Record, except that you don't have (and you can't) change the InitByte field.
FillChar preserves the constant field and behaves as expected.

procedure TForm2.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  r: TPacket;
begin
  FillChar(r, SizeOf(r), #0);
  ShowMessage(Format('InitByte = %d, FirstVal = %d, SecondVal = %d', [r.InitByte, r.FirstVal,r.SecondVal]));
  // r.InitByte := 42;  // not allowed by compiler
  // r.FirstVal := 251; // not allowed by compiler
  r.FirstVal := 1;
  r.SecondVal := 2;
  ShowMessage(Format('InitByte = %d, FirstVal = %d, SecondVal = %d', [r.InitByte, r.FirstVal,r.SecondVal]));
end;

Updated to include the nested type range 0..250

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1  
Awesome. First real answer. –  Mike W Mar 15 '12 at 21:18
    
@Mike, almost is. François, you are missing the range keeping of the FirstVal and SecondVal. If I get it right, they should be in the range of 0..250. But then you can meet the problem with FillChar which can set the values out of this bounds (with range checking off surely). –  TLama Mar 15 '12 at 21:50
1  
@TLama, I was relying on the OP's record declaration and missed the range thing. Updated answer with a sub-type... –  François Mar 15 '12 at 22:11
2  
@TLama, FillChar never follows value range as it is just writing any byte in the reserved memory. The const declaration makes the first field inaccessible to FillChar; that's pretty much all we can do. Can't prevent either going and poking directly in memory ;-) –  François Mar 15 '12 at 22:17
    
@TLama, ` Value := 251; R.FirstVal := Value;` will give you a Range Checking Error (provided you have it On in the compile Options), like any other range abuse you'll try to sneak in. :) –  François Mar 15 '12 at 22:24
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Modern versions of Delphi allow record methods. While you can't prevent someone from changing the field you can at least initialize it properly:

type
  TPacket = record
    InitByte: byte; // =255, constant
    FirstVal,
    SecondVal: byte;
    constructor Create(val1, val2 : byte);
  end;


constructor TPacket.Create(val1, val2: byte);
begin
  InitByte := 255;
  FirstVal := val1;
  SecondVal := val2;
end;
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1  
Unfortunately, you can't enforce the use of the constructor... –  François Mar 15 '12 at 21:17
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Given the fact that records can now have properties, you can define a record as:

TMixedFixed = record
strict private
  FFixed: byte;
  FVariable1: byte;
  FVariable2: byte;
public
  property Fixed read FFixed;
  property Variable read FVariable write FVariable;
  constructor Create(Var1, Var2: byte);
end; 

constructor TMixedFixed.create(Var1, Var2: byte);
begin
  FFixed:= 255;
  FVariable1:= Var1;
  FVariable2:= Var2;  
end;

Given the fact that the real variables are strict private you should not be able to touch them without special magic. You will have to use the constructor to init the 'fixed' values though.

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It does not prevent to declare a variable and use it as a standard record without using the constructor. You'll just have garbage in FFixed and no way to change it... –  François Mar 15 '12 at 20:29
    
@François, can't you overrule the default constructor? –  Johan Mar 16 '12 at 11:52
    
not that I know of. The default constructor is so prominent that it even prevents you from declaring another parameterless constructor. Any custom constructor you provide needs to have parameter(s). See docwiki: "Records are constructed automatically, using a default no-argument constructor, but classes must be explicitly constructed. Because records have a default no-argument constructor, any user-defined record constructor must have one or more parameters." –  François Mar 16 '12 at 17:33
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This is the most simple way:

type
  TPacket = record
    InitByte: byte; // =255, constant
    FirstVal,
    SecondVal: byte;
  end;

var  
  Packet : TPacket = (InitByte: 255);

const
  Packet1 : TPacket = (InitByte: 255);
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1  
No, it's not the only way, see my answer. And, BTW, you cannot initialize local variables like your Packet variable (compiler error E2195). –  François Mar 15 '12 at 21:14
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