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Why is runtime library a compiler option rather than a linker option?

I do not understand clearly why i have to choose type of RTL at the compiling stage?

For example i have created one static library A.lib with option /MD. Then i've created second static library B.lib with option /MT.

When i try to link A.lib and B.lib to my C.exe I will get linker error.

But at the compiling stage (creation A.lib and B.lib) there is no any reasons to resolve symbols from c or c++ runtime.

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marked as duplicate by ildjarn, Bo Persson, EJP, Employed Russian, Mike DeSimone Mar 17 '12 at 3:12

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Related. stackoverflow.com/questions/521972/… –  Captain Giraffe Mar 15 '12 at 19:18
    
The CRT is just not very compatible with it. Biggest problem are global variables, like errno. Gets redefined to a function with /MD in effect. –  Hans Passant Mar 15 '12 at 19:37

1 Answer 1

When you build with /MD, the compiler uses a different set of predefined macros, then when you build with /MT. See documentation and pay attention to _MT, _DLL, etc. macros.

at the compiling stage (creation A.lib and B.lib) there is no any reasons to resolve symbols from c or c++ runtime.

That is true, but if you include any system headers, your preprocessed source is actually different depending on which of /MD, /MT, etc. flags you've used, and that matters very much at compile stage.

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