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I see this throughout our codebase:

(function(undefined) {
    var foo = {
        dirtyRow: undefined,
        dirtyCells: undefined,
        ...
        clearDirty: function () {
            this.dirtyRow = undefined;
            this.dirtyCells = undefined;
        }
    }
})();

Can someone articulate for me what's wrong with this? What should we be doing instead?

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At least you can see what the object can/should contain. Though setting them to null might be more semantical. –  pimvdb Mar 15 '12 at 19:35
    
@pst: Because it's more difficult to differ between something that doesn't exist and something that has been defined as undefined. I guess opinions differ on this. –  pimvdb Mar 15 '12 at 19:43
    
@pimvdb Oops, I missed a critical part of the code: my issue is that it uses undefined as a parameter name, which can cause all sorts of confusion! –  user166390 Mar 15 '12 at 19:44
    
@pst wouldn't his/her object properties need a value? for them i'd use null as for the others i'd just do this: this. dirtyRow; this.dirtyCells; for vars when you don't include a value(nor an = sign) it will automatically be undefined his argument should also be null –  zero Mar 15 '12 at 19:46
    
@codewombat undefined is a value, it all just comes down to the semantics given I guess. I do not really see a reason for one of the other (except it may be easier to test for the shape with o.p != null vs !(p in o)). It is unfortunate of the use of undefined as a parameter name here, as that adds a whole different issue/reason :( –  user166390 Mar 15 '12 at 19:57
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

null makes more sense than undefined in this context, because you are defining the variables but are not yet assigning a value to them.

However both null and undefined are falsy values, so for the most part the behaviour will be the same.

null is a keyword though, whereas undefined is not. So null would be more "reliable", even if you are using the argument to ensure that undefined is in fact undefined.

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2  
I can agree with the former, but not the latter. If the value undefined evaluates to, even if valid, is altered, then the programming environment has forfeited its contract. I believe this is no different than having 1+1 return 3 on occasion. –  user166390 Mar 15 '12 at 19:48
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One thing that is wrong, is that you shouldn't use the undefined "constant" at all, until all browsers are up to the latest version of the Javascript specs.

Lately the specifications changed it to a real constant, but all older browsers follow the older specs, where it's a writable value. That means that the undefined identifier can be changed to a different value, which of course would make that code do something that was not intended.

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It has been passed as the infamous argument here, which should work fine. –  pimvdb Mar 15 '12 at 19:41
2  
I beg to differ about the "constant" stuff (programming is about working with a set of assumptions and if they are violated then the contract is off). However, what I do believe is that one should not use undefined as a parameter or variable name (even in an attempt to "fix" the constant issue). –  user166390 Mar 15 '12 at 19:45
1  
@pst: Naturally you can't check for everything and avoid anything, but there are some things that you should avoid as they are not properly specified/implemented. –  Guffa Mar 15 '12 at 19:49
1  
@Guffa I avoid altering the assumptions (e.g. keeping the expected contracts valid). For instance, True,False = False,True is entirely valid in earlier Python versions as they were not reserved. Does that mean that True and False should be avoided in Python? –  user166390 Mar 15 '12 at 19:50
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I don't see anything wrong with this code. This approach is used to ensure that undefined is really "undefined", because in non strict mode (ES5) you could override that value (so if you use 3rd party script or a malicious script will be inject in your page).

Basically you have an argument and you call this function without pass any value, so it will be "undefined". You could obtain the same result having:

(function(u) {
    var foo = {
        dirtyRow: u,
        dirtyCells: u,
        ...
        clearDirty: function () {
            this.dirtyRow = u;
            this.dirtyCells = u;
        }
    }
})();

But, of course, using undefined makes more sense.

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I disagree with it making more sense, excepting that it shows what is happening here. If the environment establishes that undefined evaluates to ... not undefined ... then the environment is already broken. (I would just keep the assumption/rule in place and remove the undefined parameter in the original code.) All that aside, does it make sense to set a value to show the "shape" of the object? –  user166390 Mar 15 '12 at 19:52
    
Makes more sense in the way that undefined is more "understable" than u or something else. In fact, the environment IS broken, you shouldn't be able to redefine undefined (it sounds funny even to read). So, this is a workaround to play safe in a language that is broken. In ES5 in strict mode infact, you cannot do that: you get an exception. –  ZER0 Mar 16 '12 at 9:42
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