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Good day.

I'd like to ask for contribution on tricks to handle unrolled loops leftovers, with a caveat that loops are fairly small, 1-3 times the unrolling factor, eg:

EG. given unrolling factor of B

int i = 0;
for (; i < N-N%B; i += B) {
    ...
}
// remainder
for (; i < N; ++i) {
    ...
}

if B is 2, I can do the following:

// remainder
if (N%2) {
    ....
}

But what is a good way to handle B>2

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Hard to see why a trick is needed, you loop N / B times, remainder is N % B. You'd normally leave this up to the code generator, it already knows how to unroll loops. –  Hans Passant Mar 15 '12 at 20:11
    
Well there's always Duff's device but there's nothing wrong with your code. –  Mike Dunlavey Mar 15 '12 at 20:57
    
In C or any language? Predicated instructions can be nice for this in some assembly languages. –  harold Mar 15 '12 at 22:40
    
@Mike I was thinking something along those lines. The loops are short so that remainder has significant ovrhead. –  Anycorn Mar 15 '12 at 23:56
    
@harold C is preferred but may be yu can give some examples with assembly? –  Anycorn Mar 15 '12 at 23:57

1 Answer 1

Your if (N%2) can be easily extended to any unroll factor:

for (; i < N-B+1; i += B) {
    x1; x2; ... xB;
}
if (i < N) {
    x1;
if (i < N-1) {
    x2;
    ...
if (i < N-B+2) {
    xB;
}}}

For small unroll factors this may be more efficient than second loop or Duff's device.

This version looks better. gcc 4.6 compiles almost the same code out of it:

if (i++ < N) {
    x1;
if (i++ < N) {
    x2;
    ...
if (i++ < N) {
    xB;
}}}

And this version may be more optimal if B is a power of two. At least gcc compiles better code for it. Also it is definitely the best if N is a constant. But if neither N is a constant, nor B is a power of two, advantage of this method is not so obvious because of less efficient remainder computation (which means usually several instructions, including multiplication):

if (N%B > B-2) {
    x1;
if (N%B > B-3) {
    x2;
    ...
if (N%B > 0) {
    xB;
}}}
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