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I'm trying to raise a PropertyChanged event that is being listened to by a weak event handler (via PropertyChangedEventManager). For some reason I'm getting an ExecutionEngineException when I raise the event.

My event raising code looks like:

protected virtual void RaisePropertyChanged(string aPropertyName)
{
    var lHandler = this.PropertyChanged;

    if (lHandler != null)
    {
        // ExecutionEngineException is thrown here
        lHandler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(aPropertyName));
    }

    return;
}

My handling code looks like:

public bool ReceiveWeakEvent(Type aManagerType, object aSender, EventArgs e)
{
    bool lHandled = false;

    if (aManagerType == typeof(PropertyChangedEventManager))
    {
        OnPropertyChanged(aSender, e as PropertyChangedEventArgs);
    }

    return lHandled;
}

I'm not getting any useful results when I search for this exception, and the exception itself doesn't contain any useful information! What's causing the problem?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Props to the author of the ExecutionEngineException when raising the PropertyChanged event blog entry. He describes the problem and solution perfectly, but for some reason his page doesn't appear very high in web search results. I wanted to post the question and answer here to help out more people who encounter the same issue.

So it turns out that WeakEventManager will call Environment.FailFast() if you return false from ReceiveWeakEvent.

What an insidious bug! I agree with a quote from the blog entry:

This may be the most ridiculously over-reactive error processing I've ever seen in my life.

My fixed handler looks like:

public bool ReceiveWeakEvent(Type aManagerType, object aSender, EventArgs e)
{
    bool lHandled = false;

    if (aManagerType == typeof(PropertyChangedEventManager))
    {
        OnPropertyChanged(aSender, e as PropertyChangedEventArgs);
        lHandled = true;
    }

    return lHandled;
}
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1  
Hehe. Kind of classic, this is actually triggered by an Assert(). The programmer surely didn't realize that this particular method would still assert in the release build. You can get a better outcome by setting the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework\DbgJITDebugLaunchSetting setting to 0x12. –  Hans Passant Mar 15 '12 at 20:46
    
So glad you posted this; I never would've thought that returning false from the event handler would result in a FailFast, but apparently it does. –  Dan Bryant Nov 6 '13 at 14:18

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