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I have a data.frame and I'm trying to create a frequency table that shows the frequency of values for each row. So I'm starting with something like this:

d <- data.frame(a=c(1,2,3), b=c(3,4,5), c=c(1,2,5))

which looks like this:

  a b c
  1 3 1
  2 4 2
  3 5 5

What I'd really like to create is a contingency data.frame or matrix that looks like this:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
0, 2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
0, 0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0

The top row is simply a label row and need not be in the final result. But I add it there for illustration. Each row shows the digits 1:9 and the number of times each digit shows up in each row of the starting data.

I can't wrap my head around an easy way to create this. Although it seems like the table() function should be helpful, I can't get it to give me any love. Any help or ideas are appreciated.

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4  
You have a data.frame full of numbers? How quickly you forget, grasshopper... use a matrix. –  Joshua Ulrich Mar 16 '12 at 0:46
    
Does using a matrix change the answer? –  JD Long Mar 16 '12 at 13:04
    
It doesn't change Josh O'Brien's answer because apply automatically converts it first argument to a matrix/array. I'm not sure about Ilya's. I was mostly teasing anyway. ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Mar 16 '12 at 14:45
    
i know you were kidding, but it did make me wonder... –  JD Long Mar 16 '12 at 18:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here you go:

t(apply(d, 1, tabulate, nbin=9))
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
[1,]    2    0    1    0    0    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0    2    0    1    0    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0    0    1    0    2    0    0    0    0

(Though it probably doesn't matter in this application, tabulate() (which is used inside of the code for table()) is also nice for the impressive speed with which it performs its calculations.)


EDIT: tabulate() isn't set up to deal with 0s or negative integers. If you want another one liner that does, you could use table() though, doing something like this:

d <- data.frame(a=c(0,-1,-2), b=c(3,4,5), c=c(1,2,5))

t(apply(d, 1, function(X) table(c(X, -9:9)) - 1))
     -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
[1,]  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
[2,]  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
[3,]  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
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Definitely (another) one of those simple gems of base R. Thanks again R-core! –  Josh O'Brien Mar 15 '12 at 21:15
    
any way to make it accomodate zero and negative values? Upon inspecting my use case, those are more important than I realized when I did the simple question. –  JD Long Mar 15 '12 at 21:33
1  
@JDLong -- I added a one-liner using table() that deals gracefully with zero and negative integers. You'd just need to adjust the -9:9 bit to cover whatever range you're interested in, and any numbers outside of that range will still be included in the table. By adding a few preliminary lines that check for the range of the integers in the original data.frame and set the range in the output table, you could easily wrap this up into a nice little function to do what you want. Cheers. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 15 '12 at 21:53

another solution using table

library(reshape)
d <- data.frame(a=c(1,2,3), b=c(3,4,5), c=c(1,2,5))
d2 <- melt(d)
d2$rows <- rep(1:nrow(d), ncol(d))
table(d2$rows, d2$value)
share|improve this answer
    
this has the distinct advantage of handling zeros and negative values properly which was about to be my follow on question. Very nice! –  JD Long Mar 15 '12 at 21:13

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