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I'm learning ruby, and there has been a bit of talk about the upto method in the book from which I am learning. What exactly does it do, I'm confused... Example:

grades = [88,99,73,56,87,64]
sum = 0
0.upto(grades.length - 1) do |loop_index|
    sum += grades[loop_index]
end
average = sum/grades.length
puts average
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5  
You may want to look for another book. In this case, this upto < grades.length.times < grades.each < grades.inject(0, :+). –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 15 '12 at 21:14
    
Hopefully your book isn't saying upto is an operator; it's a regular method. Edited your question accordingly. –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 15 '12 at 21:16
    
@Marc-AndréLafortune Lots of Ruby books are like that - they tell you exactly what Ruby has, but not why you'd use one way over another. :( –  Andrew Grimm Mar 15 '12 at 21:51
    
Oh. My. Gawd. This has got to be the crappiest Ruby code I have ever seen. Is this really code from a book? –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 16 '12 at 0:43
    
Yes, it is from a book, Beginning Ruby on Rails by Steven Holzner –  Billjk Mar 16 '12 at 1:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Let's try an explanation:

You define an array

grades = [88,99,73,56,87,64]

and prepare a variable to store the sum:

sum = 0

grades.length is 6 (there are 6 elements in the array), (grades.length - 1) is 5.

with 0.upto(5) you loop from 0 to 5, loop_index will be 0, then 1...

The first element of the array is grades[0] (the index in the array starts with 0). That's why you have to subtract 1 from the number of elements.

0.upto(grades.length - 1) do |loop_index|

Add the loop_index's value to sum.

    sum += grades[loop_index]
end

Now you looped on each element and have the sum of all elements of the array.

You can calculate the average:

average = sum/grades.length

Now you write the result to stdout:

puts average

This was a non-ruby-like syntax. Ruby-like you would do it like this:

grades = [88,99,73,56,87,64]
sum = 0
grades.each do |value|
    sum += value
end
average = sum/grades.length
puts average

Addendum based on Marc-Andrés comment:

You may use also inject to avoid to define the initial sum:

grades = [88,99,73,56,87,64] 
sum = grades.inject do |sum, value|     
  sum + value 
end
average = sum / grades.length 
puts average 

Or even shorter:

grades = [88,99,73,56,87,64] 
average = grades.inject(:+) / grades.length 
puts average 
share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation. I would just add that foo = start, enum.each{|i| foo = some_function(foo, i)} is a pattern for which Rubyist can use inject. –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 16 '12 at 2:19
    
Thanks for the hint with inject. This method makes always knots in my brain ;) –  knut Mar 16 '12 at 14:17

From http://www.ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/ref_c_integer.html#upto:

upto int.upto( anInteger ) {| i | block }

Iterates block, passing in integer values from int up to and including anInteger.

5.upto(10) { |i| print i, " " }

produces:

5 6 7 8 9 10
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It is just another way to do a loop/iterator in Ruby. It says do this action n times based on i being the first number the the number in parens as the limit.

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Upto executes the block given once for each number from the original number "upto" the argument passed. For example:

1.upto(10) {|x| puts x}

will print out the numbers 1 through 10.

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