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What is the best way to align the following?

I want the .inputTitle on the left and the inputInput on the right with the error inbetween them both.

CSS:

.crud_form{
    width:430px;
    margin:10px solid;
    font-family:Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
    background:orange;
}
.inputTitle{
    float:left;
    clear:left;
    margin:11px 10px 10px 0;
    width:95px;
    background:green;
}
.inputRequired{
    float:left;
    margin:5px;
    width:113px;
    background:blue;
}
.inputError{
    float:left;
    margin:10px;
    background:red;
}

.crud_form select textarea{
    float:left;
    clear:both;
}

HTML:

<form action="#" method="post" accept-charset="utf-8" class="crud_form" enctype="multipart/form-data">
<span class="inputTitle">First Name</span><span class="inputInput"><input type="text" name="first_name" value="" id="first_name"  /></span><span class="inputError"></span>

<span class="inputTitle">Last Name</span><span class="inputInput"><input type="text" name="last_name" value="" id="last_name"  /></span><span class="inputError"></span>

<span class="inputTitle">Address</span><span class="inputInput"><textarea name="address" cols="40" rows="10" id="address" ></textarea></span><span class="inputError"></span>

<span class="inputTitle">Phone</span><span class="inputInput"><input type="text" name="phone" value="" id="phone"  /></span><span class="inputError"></span>

<span class="inputTitle">Item</span><span class="inputInput"><select name="item" id="item">
<option value="Caps cost $15"></option>
<option value="Mugs cost $20"></option>
<option value="Childrens T-shirts, sizes 0 to 6">$10</option>
<option value="Ladies (no photo) cost $20"></option>
<option value="Men cost $20"></option>
</select></span>

<span class="inputError"></span>
<span class="inputTitle">Comments</span><span class="inputInput"><textarea name="comments" cols="40" rows="10" id="comments" ></textarea></span><span class="inputError"></span>

<input type="submit" value="Save" />

</form>
share|improve this question
    
Consider a self-contained fiddle too. –  Kirk Woll Mar 15 '12 at 21:08
2  
Aside: please use proper labels explicitly associated with the related input instead of a generic span: <label class="inputTitle" for="last_name">Last Name</label>. This is not only is nice for your users, but since the labels are programmatically associated with the inputs, and not dependent upon proximity, it gives you more latitude to arrange the markup. –  steveax Mar 15 '12 at 21:16
    
@steveax I totally agree with using labels as they improve UX. However, you make it sound like it's a good thing to have labels a long distance away from their content, which doesn't make any sense to me. –  Moses Mar 15 '12 at 21:23
    
@Moses Yes, labels should be near the inputs, but in this particular case, where the OP wants the error message container in between the label and input, it may reduce the need for a bunch of CSS positioning. –  steveax Mar 15 '12 at 21:27
    
@steveax: Positioning is definitely not the route to go regardless. –  Aaron Brewer Mar 15 '12 at 21:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know why you guys using DIVs, SPANs and LI's etc. It's simple look at example below:

HTML

<p>
<label for="IDofInput">text goes here</label><input type="text" id="IDofInput" />
</p>
<p>
<label for="IDofInput">text goes here</label><input type="text" id="IDofInput" />
</p>
<p>
<label for="IDofInput">text goes here</label><input type="text" id="IDofInput" />
</p>

CSS

label {width: 300px; padding-right: 20px; display: inline-block }
share|improve this answer

I want the .inputTitle on the left and the inputInput on the right with the error inbetween them both.

The way that I have always done this was to set a width for them.

For example:

If you were to have 3 floated elements, and you wanted them to align perfectly within the "Container" per se, the Container would of course need a width set.

After you were to set the width of the Container, set the width of those 3 floated elements to equal the width of the Container.

See below:

HTML:

<div class="container">
     <div class="inputTitle"></div>
     <div class="inputError"></div>
     <div class="inputInput"></div>
     <div class="clear"></div>
</div>

CSS

.container {
   width: 600px;
}
.inputTitle {
   width: 200px;
   float: left;
}
.inputError {
   width: 200px;
   float: left;
}
.inputInput {
   width: 200px;
   float: left;
}
.clear {
   clear: both;
}

Ultimately you could add the clear: both; CSS Declaration on the Container, but I like to make a clear: both; Class just to be on the safe side.

Of course you can always use Labels, but setting a pre-defined width for a label via CSS would apply to all Labels, within a class and or id.

I hope that helps! Thanks! Aaron

share|improve this answer
1  
You could always use <label class="something"> to limit the effect of the CSS, or, as I prefer, use a more specific CSS selector such as div.container > label { ... } (immediate child, or omit the > for any descendant label) –  Stephen P Mar 15 '12 at 21:57
    
@StephenP: That is a great way to do it too! I was also thinking he may use selector first and last children to do the three he was going for, but I didn't want to get too complex. –  Aaron Brewer Mar 15 '12 at 22:20

To clean up the vertical alignment, you could wrap each label - input pair in a containing div, then float the inputs to the right. I am not sure based on your question if this is the alignment you are looking for, but it does have a nicer appearance.

HTML:

<form action="#" method="post" accept-charset="utf-8" class="crud_form" enctype="multipart/form-data">
  <div class="formdiv">
<span class="inputTitle">First Name</span>
<span class="inputInput">
  <input type="text" name="first_name" value="" id="first_name"  />
</span>
<span class="inputError"></span>
  </div>

  <div class="formdiv">
<span class="inputTitle">Last Name</span>
<span class="inputInput">
  <input type="text" name="last_name" value="" id="last_name"  /></span>
<span class="inputError"></span>
  </div>

  <div class="formdiv">
<span class="inputTitle">Address</span>
<span class="inputInput"><textarea name="address" cols="40" rows="10" id="address" ></textarea></span><span class="inputError"></span>
  </div>

  <div class="formdiv">
  <span class="inputTitle">Phone</span><span class="inputInput"><input type="text" name="phone" value="" id="phone"  /></span><span class="inputError"></span>
  </div>

  <div class="formdiv">
  <span class="inputTitle">Item</span><span class="inputInput"><select name="item" id="item">
  <option value="Caps cost $15"></option>
  <option value="Mugs cost $20"></option>
  <option value="Childrens T-shirts, sizes 0 to 6">$10</option>
  <option value="Ladies (no photo) cost $20"></option>
  <option value="Men cost $20"></option>
  </select></span>

  <span class="inputError"></span>
  </div>

  <div class="formdiv">
  <span class="inputTitle">Comments</span><span class="inputInput"><textarea name="comments" cols="40" rows="10" id="comments" ></textarea></span><span class="inputError"></span>
  </div>

  <input type="submit" value="Save" />

</form>

CSS:

.formdiv {
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
    margin-bottom: 1em;
}

.crud_form{
    width:430px;
    margin:10px solid;
    padding: 10px;
    font-family:Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
    background:orange;
}
.inputTitle {
    float:left;
    clear:left;
/*    margin:11px 10px 10px 0; */
    width:95px;
    background:green;
}

.inputInput {
    float: right;
}

.inputRequired{
    float:left;
    margin:5px;
    width:113px;
    background:blue;
}
.inputError{
    float:left;
    margin:10px;
    background:red;
}

.crud_form select textarea{
    float:left;
    clear:both;
}
share|improve this answer

The best way to structure a two-column form is to use a two-column table element inside a form element. But as you say that you want “the error” (apparently, error indicator or error message) between input label (title) and input field, you actually want a three-column form, i.e. three-column table.

<form ...>
<table>
<tbody>
  <tr><td class="inputTitle"><label for="first_name">First Name</label></td>
      <td class="inputError"><span></span></td>
      <td class="inputInput"><input type="text" name="first_name" id="first_name"  /></td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</form>

This (apart from simulating it using CSS table features, which have limited browser support) is the only way to make browsers allocated widths to the columns, according to the width requirements of the content, instead of your making wild guesses on what might be needed.

share|improve this answer

Abstract

IMHO (and the W3C is backing me up), list semantics are best to describe form layouts - forms as lists of prompt data. In this presentation a grid is being used to layout the form controls.

Reference

to see a full depiction on how it's done, please refer to W3C's reference on this, originally published at the Opera developers community, on their Web Standards Curriculum.

Code Example / Implementation

HTML:

<form>
  <ul>
    <li><label for="realname">Name:</label><input type="text" name="name" value="" class="medium" id="realname" /></li>
    <li><label for="address">Email:</label><input type="text" name="email" value="" class="medium" id="address" /></li>
    <li><label for="messageBody">Comments:</label><textarea name="comments" cols="32" rows="8" class="long" id="messageBody"></textarea></li>
  </ul>
</form>

CSS:

/* base font size, other measures relay on seventh parts of this */
body {
    font-size: 14px;
    line-height: 1.714em;
}

/* form styles */
form {
    margin: 0;
    width: 35.929em;
}

/* reset list styles to be used as form layout mechanism */
ul {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    list-style-type: none;
}
li {
    clear: both;
    height: 1.714em;
    margin: 0;
}

/* form controls styles */
fieldset {
    height: 1.429em;
    margin: 0 0 -.143em 0;
    border: 0;
}
label {
    display: block;
    float: left;
    clear: left;
    width: 10.286em;
    overflow: auto;
    padding-right: 1.714em;
    text-align: right;
}
input {
    height: 1.143em;
    border: .071em solid rgb(96,96,96);
    padding: .071em;
    line-height: .929em;
}
textarea {
    height: 4.714em;
    margin-bottom: .286em;
    border: .071em solid rgb(96,96,96);
    padding: 0;
}
input,
textarea {    
    margin-top: 0;
    font-size: 100%;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    overflow: hidden;
    font-family: Futura,'Century Gothic',sans-serif;
    font-size: 1em;
}

/* input and textarea variants */
.medium {
    width: 11.714em;
}
.long {
    width: 20.429em;
}

you can play with the full code example in this jsFiddle (this does not contain the IE stylesheet).

Update

I've edited the answer to include only the relevant code for a two column layout form. please refer to the above links for a fully working example.

share|improve this answer
    
Copy and Paste Much? This is not a good example. It signifies nothing. You simply copy and pasted an HTML Page... –  Aaron Brewer Mar 15 '12 at 22:20
    
I'd up-vote your answer if it was condensed down into a concise example showing only the most relevant code. –  Sparky Mar 16 '12 at 1:00
    
@Sparky672 - all code is relevant for form layout, but i see your point (and a need that up-vote (: ) - so i edited the answer to contain the fiddle link only. –  Eliran Malka Mar 16 '12 at 9:39
    
some explanation for the down-vote, please? –  Eliran Malka Mar 16 '12 at 11:02
1  
If you'd like other opinions about how to improve this answer, write better answers in general or ask about down-votes, you can start a full discussion at meta.stackoverflow.com as these comments is not the proper place. –  Sparky Mar 16 '12 at 15:36

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