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I use XNA, and one of the things i do a lot is pass around data as Vector2s. Now, a lot of the objects in XNA (such as a graphics device and such), inste3ad of containing a Vector2 that tells you the size of the viewport, they offer separate Width and Height methods. Is there some way to add a Vector2 property to them so i can get that data without manually building a new vector2 everytime i need it? i guess what i want is something like "extension properties"...

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use Michael's approach, but that does in fact build a new Vector2 every time. If you really only want the Vector2 to be created once, you can wrap the class you want, and provide your own Vector2 property:

public class GraphicsDeviceWrapper
{
   private Vector2 vector;
   public GraphicsDeviceWrapper(GraphicsDevice device)
   {
      this.vector = new Vector2(device.Viewport.Width, device.Viewport.Height);
      this.Device = device;
   }

   public Vector2 Vector
   {
      get{return this.vector;}
   }

   public GraphicsDevice Device
   { 
      get; private set
   }
}
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This should work. Thanks! –  RCIX Jun 9 '09 at 23:00
    
I think I'll actually derive from GraphicsDevice to offer the extensions i need so my code can use the fancy addons I write but any stuff that uses a regular graphics device will still work. Since this answer inspired that idea however it will still be the accepted answer. Thanks! –  RCIX Jun 9 '09 at 23:05
    
I wasn't sure if GraphicsDevice was sealed or not (for some reason I assumed it was) which is why I offered a "wrapper" solution instead. –  BFree Jun 9 '09 at 23:11
    
if you're gonna downvote ppl, post a reason... –  BFree Jun 10 '09 at 1:30
    
??? I didnt downvote you. i upvoted you! i cant even downvote yet... –  RCIX Jun 10 '09 at 2:36

Vector2 is a value type ... honestly, you don't really have to worry too much about creating new instances because they're created on the stack. Every time you can the .Vector property it's going to make a new instance anyways.

you don't have to worry about it though because value types do not invoke the garbage collector. Thus, the biggest reason to try to instantiate once is nullified (ie. the GC).

that being said, for larger structs such as a Matrix, you may want to consider passing them byref to avoid new allocations on the stack.

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My main problem with using a new vector is that it is 2 or 3 times longer than just using a variable. –  RCIX Jun 10 '09 at 2:38
    
"created on the stack" this is incorrect blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/30/… –  lukas Feb 14 '11 at 22:09
    
yes @lukas, I wrote this response before eric's blog post was published. But it is at least partially correct ;-) –  Joel Martinez Feb 15 '11 at 10:45

In terms of efficiency, it's better to just use the Width and Height properties to do whatever you need wherever you can. Don't forget the #1 rule of optimization, however: don't do it.

The idea of a wrapper class is a good solution, but I just though I'd throw the idea of a globally convertible structure out there. I use something like this to do away with worrying about vector->point and point->vector conversions (during debugging at least):

[DebuggerDisplay("{value}")]
public struct PointyVector
{
    Vector2 value;

//Constructors:
    public PointyVector(System.Drawing.Point point)
    {
        value = new Vector2(point.X, point.Y);
    }
    public PointyVector(Point point)
    {
        value = new Vector2(point.X, point.Y);
    }
    public PointyVector(Vector2 vector)
    {
        value = new Vector2(vector.X, vector.Y);
    }


//Implicit conversion operators:
    public static implicit operator PointyVector(Vector2 vector)
    {
        return new PointyVector(vector);
    }
    public static implicit operator PointyVector(System.Drawing.Point point)
    {
        return new PointyVector(point);
    }
    public static implicit operator PointyVector(Point point)
    {
        return new PointyVector(point);
    }
    public static implicit operator Vector2(PointyVector vector)
    {
        return vector.value;
    }
    public static implicit operator Point(PointyVector vector)
    {
        return new Point((int)vector.X, (int)vector.Y);
    }

}

This structure, with the addition of a few binary operators between Vector2 and Point, makes vector/point stuff in Xna a lot simpler, but it can also lead to casting ambiguities, roundoff errors, truncation losses, and all the other fun problems that are associated with numeric conversions. All of these problems are easily solved with explicit casts, but just be aware that, if you see "weird numbers" while using this structure, it's probably from precision loss during conversions.

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Extension properties aren't supported, but you can still code an extension method:

class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static Vector2 GetViewSize(this GraphicsDevice device)
    {
        return new Vector2(device.Viewport.Width, device.Viewport.Height);
    }
}
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