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I am attempting to 'on the fly' format the output of openfiles.exe instead of saving the output to a csv and importing it. If I simply run openfiles /query /s SERVERNAME /fo table I get

ID       Accessed By          Type       Open File (Path\executable)
======== ==================== ========== =====================================
1558     AUSERNAME            Windows    D:\..\Imaging\Itool.ldb

Now I want to sort the results on the fly by either Accessed By or Open File so I have tried openfiles /query /s SERVERNAME /fo table | Format-Table "Accessed By","Open File (Path\executable)" -auto Which just spits out the same thing as the first command. Ideally I only want "Accessed By" and "Open File (Path\executable)" and just be able to sort em by either one. I am trying to avoid doing the csv thing.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a little tricky as openfiles isn't a PowerShell cmdlet. It just displays its data in a table but it's not objects it returns. PowerShell just takes them as strings.

$item = New-Object PSObject
switch -regex (openfiles /query /s SERVERNAME /fo list) {
    '([^:]+):\s+(.*)$' {
        $item | Add-Member NoteProperty $Matches[1] $Matches[2]
    }
    '^$' {
        if ($item) { $item }
        $item = New-Object PSObject
    }
}

This uses the list format, parses it and constructs objects which you can then use. Wrap it in a function (or a subexpression with $(...)) and you can use Format-Table:

$(
    $item = New-Object PSObject
    switch -regex (openfiles /query /s SERVERNAME /fo list) {
        '([^:]+):\s+(.*)$' {
            $item | Add-Member NoteProperty $Matches[1] $Matches[2]
        }
        '^$' {
            if ($item) { $item }
            $item = New-Object PSObject
        }
    }
) | ft 'Accessed By','Open File (Path\executable)' -auto

Or you just change the commands a little. I used switch's intrinsic capability of iterating, but you can do the same with an explicit pipeline:

openfiles /query /s SERVERNAME /fo list |
  ForEach-Object {
    $item = New-Object PSObject
  } {
    switch -regex ($_) {
      '([^:]+):\s+(.*)$' {
        $item | Add-Member NoteProperty $Matches[1] $Matches[2]
      }
      '^$' {
        if ($item) { $item }
        $item = New-Object PSObject
      }
    }
  }

Since this is a pipeline you can add more commands at the end at will.

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You can not format the output, because it returns array of strings. Instead you might try to parse it, although imho it's easier to save as csv and import

$out = openfiles /query /s SERVERNAME /fo table
$out | 
    Select-Object -Skip 2 | 
    Foreach-Object { 
        if ($_ -match '([^\s]+)\s+([^\s]+)\s+([^\s]+)\s+(.*)') {
            New-Object PsObject -prop @{
                Id=[int]$matches[1]; 
                AccessedBy=$matches[2]
                Type=$matches[3]
                OpenFile=$matches[4]
            }
        }
    } | 
    Sort-Object OpenFile

(I have no chance to test openfiles)

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For the regex I guess \S is easier to read than [^\s]. And you can test it by opening a file on \\localhost\c$\...; at least that's what I did to get more than a single row of data. User and file names may contain spaces, though, so the regex might match different things than you want (that's why I switched to list format which is a bit easier to parse). –  Joey Mar 16 '12 at 6:46

Having just done this you can easily convert the CSV output to a PowerShell object by doing the following

$FileList = Invoke-Expression "& C:\Windows\System32\openfiles.exe /query /s SERVERNAME /fo CSV" | 
    ConvertFrom-Csv |
    Select "Accessed By","Open File (Path\executable)"
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