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I read the whole documentation about AsyncTasks, Services,... It's pretty clear what a remote Service is for. But I'm having troubles, getting the benefit of a LocalService? The typical example is 'playing music' or downloading a big file. But why should I start a local Service for that?

I made a small Async task, simulating such a task.

AsyncTask<String, Integer, String> async = new AsyncTask<String, Integer, String>() {
            @Override
            protected String doInBackground(String... params) {
                for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
                    try {
                        Thread.sleep(500);
                        System.out.println(i);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e1) {
                        e1.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }

                return null;
            }
        };
        async.execute("");

Most answer is, that a (Local)Service is for long running activities, that have to run even when the main activity is closed. OK - but I can do this also with an Async task in the Main Activity:

Button btnFinish = (Button) findViewById(R.id.button1);
        btnFinish.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                finish();
            }
        });

Pressing the button calls onDestroy(), but the Async task is still running? So isn't that the same like starting the AsyncTask from a Service?

//EDIT: I ran a couple of tests and I'm pretty sure that the Async Task lives as long as the process does. So if I would wrap it into a local Service (common way) - it would also live as long as the process...

So why does everyone use a local Service for tasks such as downloading files, synchronising,...?!

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Service has the advantage that it's not tied to your activity lifecycle - groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/… –  zapl Mar 15 '12 at 22:10
    
Async task isn't either - see my example. I finish the Activity and Task is still running... –  Johannes Staehlin Mar 15 '12 at 22:12
    
yes it is but you can't update any UI once it finished. That can get problematic. –  zapl Mar 15 '12 at 22:18
1  
Generally speaking, the question is not about how to get things done, it is about how to get things done more reasonable, Service has it specific design for some specific use case, which may not suitable for Activity. Take HttpClient as an example, you can definitely create new HttpClient on demand in every Activities. It would be more efficient and reasonable to use service create one single HttpClient and maintain all http related code within a central place. that can be reusable from many activities. IMO I would consider Service as the C in MVC, although it can do UI stuff as well. –  yorkw Mar 15 '12 at 22:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Most answer is, that a (Local)Service is for long running activities, that have to run even when the main activity is closed. OK - but I can do this also with an Async task in the Main Activity:

Not without leaking memory. Never leak threads from a component. When an activity is destroyed, ensure all threads started by that activity will be closed quickly.

I ran a couple of tests and I'm pretty sure that the Async Task lives as long as the process does.

Correct. However, without a service, the process might live for just a few milliseconds after the user leaves the foreground activity and goes to some other app.

A service is a marker, telling Android "yo! I'm still doing work here, yo!". This marker cannot keep the process alive indefinitely, but it usually works well for things that will be running on the order of minutes or hours.

The service also has its own lifecycle, independent of activities. For example, if you want to get control every 15 minutes to do some work, the proper solution is to use AlarmManager and an IntentService, and there might be no activity of this app around.

So why does everyone use a local Service for tasks such as downloading files, synchronising

Because we want it to work properly.

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Can I go with: Application 1 -> Activity A -> start AsyncTask. Application 2 -> Activity B -> start Service S -> Start Async task. If I close both application (finish() ), Application 1 is rather killed? Because Service S keeps Application 'alive' (higher priroty for the OS) ?! –  Johannes Staehlin Mar 15 '12 at 22:37
    
@JohannesStaehlin: If I understand your scenario correctly, Application 1's process will be terminated before Application 2's process. How quickly Application 1's process will be terminated depends on a lot of things, such as what else is going on with the device and what the user is going to do next. Application 1's process may live for milliseconds or hours -- you just don't know. –  CommonsWare Mar 15 '12 at 22:56
    
Ok, but the important thing is that we don't know. In App2: As long as we have a Service running, the process usually doesn't get killed. –  Johannes Staehlin Mar 15 '12 at 23:21
    
@JohannesStaehlin: App2's process will not live forever, because there are too many sloppy developers who start up services and never stop them. App2's process will live longer than App1's. –  CommonsWare Mar 15 '12 at 23:30

The way I understand it, the intended use of an AsyncTask is more in line with updating your UI after some background processing has taken place. The idea is that when they are complete, you can perform some action on the UI thread. The way you propose using them like a service is akin to blindly queuing up a Runnable and letting it run on a background thread until its processing is complete, totally independent of the rest of the lifecycle of the Activity. Typically, one would cancel these extra hanging threads in onPause or onDestroy. It's bad form to do otherwise since they can cause errors which cause a crash dialog to appear to a user even after your Activity is closed.

You would use a local service for long-running tasks that would not require a context with the capability to display something to the user or which are independent from any Activity in your application. The system would know not to kill your Service unless the Application itself is killed (which is the benefit over tying it to an activity). They are also simpler than remote services and don't require interprocess communication or an additional process. You might also like to have a service that would trigger your application to start if invoked from elsewhere (a local service), or that would die if your application died. Remote services can run outside of your application's context, and therefore are not tied to your application's lifecycle.

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Also, see here: anddev.org/remote_service_tutorial-t8127.html This post also provides a link to local services that details some differences between the two, but more importantly they provide some use cases and justifications for using remote or local services, respectively. –  Jon O Mar 15 '12 at 22:23

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