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I was reading the Essential C# 3.0 book and am wondering if this is a good way to check delegates for null?:

class Thermostat
{
    public delegate void TemperatureChangeHandler ( float newTemperature );

    public TemperatureChangeHandler OnTemperatureChange { get; set; }

    float currentTemperature;

    public float CurrentTemperature
    {
    	get { return this.currentTemperature; }
    	set
    	{
    		if ( currentTemperature != value )
    		{
    			currentTemperature = value;

    			TemperatureChangeHandler handler = OnTemperatureChange;

    			if ( handler != null )
    			{
    				handler ( value );
    			}
    		}
    	}
    }
}

Does the solution changes if the type is immutable? I figured maybe with immutability you wouldn't run into this threading problem.

share|improve this question
    
What type is immutable. –  C. Ross Jun 9 '09 at 23:03
    
Thanks, I didn't think it thoroughly but just thought that might help for this threading case. –  Joan Venge Jun 9 '09 at 23:41
    
Shouldn't this post have the tag threading? I am bad at SO questions so I am more wondering than anything else. –  Josh C May 13 at 13:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Original (somewhat inaccurate) Response:

There has been much discussion on this.

In short: you can't guarantee that the handler will be valid even by doing this copy/check for null/ execute step.

The problem is, if OnTemperatureChange is unregistered between the time you copy it, and the time you execute the copy, then it's probably true that you don't want the listener to be executed anyway.

You may as well just do:

if (OnTemperatureChange != null )
{
    OnTemperatureChange ( value );
}

And handle a null reference exception.

I sometimes add a default handler that does nothing, just to prevent the null reference exception, but that adds performance impact quite seriously, especially in the case where there is no other handler registered.

Update 2014-07-10:

I defer to Eric Lippert.

My original response did allude to using default handlers, but I didn't recommend using a temp variable, which I now agree as good practice also, per the article.

share|improve this answer
4  
you can guarantee if you manually write the add/remove code for the event and handle the synchronization, otherwise multithreaded code should handle the possible exceptions –  Sam Saffron Jun 9 '09 at 23:09
    
So basically if I understand correctly the simple solution works in single threaded code all the time, but it's not guaranteed in multi-threaded code, and there's not simple solution? –  C. Ross Jun 9 '09 at 23:20
3  
Yerp, multi threaded code is really tricky to get right in this regard see: stackoverflow.com/questions/786383/c-events-and-thread-safety –  Sam Saffron Jun 9 '09 at 23:22
2  
Event handlers are supposed to gracefully handle being called even after they've been unregistered. The object the event handler is in will also not be garbage collected as long as the delegate holds a reference to it. In short after creating an immutable copy of an event delegate and checking it for null, it is completely safe to execute the copy. Any errors that arise out of this are the handlers' fault and they must be corrected. –  Locutus May 14 '13 at 4:25
1  
@jnm2 I think Eric Lipperts answer to the same question is a little clearer? blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/04/29/… –  John Weldon Jul 10 '14 at 17:27

There is a reason the code you've given is recommended over C. Ross's version. However, John is also right that there is still another problem if an event is unregistered in the meanwhile. The blog I linked recommends that the handler ensure they can be called even after being unregistered.

share|improve this answer

First, you aren't actually publishing an event - so at the moment, your code is "at risk" of people messing it up completely. It should be:

public event TemperatureChangeHandler CurrentTemperatureChanged;

The name "CurrentTemperatureChanged" is important for data-binding (there is a convention that the runtime uses - given a property Foo, it will look for FooChanged). However, IMO this should just be regular EventHandler. Data-binding will look for EventHandler, but more importantly: you aren't actually giving any information in the event that the subscriber can't already get just by looking at obj.CurrentTemperature.

I'll give the rest of the answer in terms of TemperatureChangeHandler, but I would encourage you (again) to switch to EventHandler:

public event EventHandler CurrentTemperatureChanged;

The approach:

TemperatureChangeHandler handler = CurrentTemperatureChanged;
if(handler != null) handler(value);

is reasonable, but (as per other replies) there is a slim risk of callers that think they disconnected getting the event. Unlikely in reality.

Another approach is an extension method:

public static class TemperatureChangeExt {
    public static void SafeInvoke(this TemperatureChangeHandler handler,
             float newTemperature) {
        if (handler != null) handler(newTemperature);
    }
}

Then in your class you can just use:

        if (currentTemperature != value) {
            currentTemperature = value;
            CurrentTemperatureChanged.SafeInvoke(value);
        }
share|improve this answer

If the Thermostat class doesn't need to be thread safe then yes the above code is fine - as long as there is only one thread accessing that instance of Thermostat there is no way for OnTemperatureChange to become unregistered between the test for null and the call to the event.

If you need to make Thermostat thread safe then you might want to take a look at the following article (new to me, looks like a good read):

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/events.html

For the record, the recommendation is that you develop your classes not to be thread safe unless thread safety is explicitly needed as it can significantly increase the complexity of your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Developing for thread safety does bot in it self increase complexity. E.g. Immutables is often a good idea in any case and they are always thread safe. –  Rune FS Jun 10 '09 at 6:13

I just see a bit of refactoring that could be done but otherwise it looks good...

class Thermostat
{
    public delegate void TemperatureChangeHandler ( float newTemperature );

    public TemperatureChangeHandler OnTemperatureChange { get; set; }

    float currentTemperature;

    public float CurrentTemperature
    {
        get { return this.currentTemperature; }
        set
        {
                if (currentTemperature != value)
                {
                        currentTemperature = value;

                        if (this.OnTemperatureChange != null )
                        {
                                this.OnTemperatureChange.Invoke( value );
                        }
                }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting... I've not seen that approach before. Why would you do .Invoke() ? –  John Weldon Jun 9 '09 at 23:31
    
Thanks. This doesn't have the same problems others mention? –  Joan Venge Jun 9 '09 at 23:33
    
wouldn't Invoke() work? It is a delegate isn't it? Not trying to be a smart a.. I may have missed something. –  bytebender Jun 9 '09 at 23:45
    
No I mean the threading issue. –  Joan Venge Jun 9 '09 at 23:57
1  
Yep, you're in a catch-22. If you copy it to a temp variable and do the check for null, you can get caught with the fact that the listener that unregisters themselves is no longer in a state capable of receiving the event. A real conundrum that I don't see a good answer to. –  jasonh Jun 10 '09 at 6:57

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