Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does C++ have a pre-built method to identify which element you are on in your foreach loop, or if there is a way to identify if you are on your last element? Or do I have to do it manually with a counter?

share|improve this question
    
If you need to know the index of each element (or any element), you should just use a for loop instead. –  Justin Peel Mar 15 '12 at 23:02
    
Why do you need to know that? –  svick Mar 15 '12 at 23:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, there is no such built-in way. Nor could there be for iterators in general, because iterators aren't required to know that they are "almost" at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see. Thank you :) –  Jon Mar 15 '12 at 23:02
    
For most iterators it's quite easy: if (it + 1 == end) –  Ben Voigt Mar 19 '12 at 15:57

If you find yourself needing the index your probably better off using a regular for loop

share|improve this answer
    
Darn it. I'm just feeling lazy to re-write my loop! Thank you :) –  Jon Mar 15 '12 at 23:02

If you need the last element, how about using another iterator to store it before you go to the next item in the container? If you set both to the start and then at the end of you loop before you get the next element (increment or decrement the iterator) , set last iterator to current and then get the next.

Something like this:

container current::iterator;
container last::iterator;
current = container.first();
last = current;  // or contianer.first();
while ( current is valid ) 
{
  // do something 
  last = current;
  // get the next item 
  current = container.next(); // or current++; 
                              // depending upon container or 
                              // iterator
}

That way you don't have to rewrite your loop, but you do need to check to make sure your container is not empty before this.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just indent code four spaces (there is a button for it look for {}) –  Loki Astari Mar 15 '12 at 23:24
    
Thank you. Bit rusty on my editing. –  Glenn Mar 15 '12 at 23:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.