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I get to pretend to be a DBA since our company doesn't have one - our servers were setup with different collation types initially, and the original T-SQL developer wrote a cursor that would cycle through all the tables with varchar/nvarchar columns and standardize the collation... due to their methodology this eventually increased the size of these columns to the maximum value as it had no controls to check for tables that had ALREADY been updated.

We desperately need to be able to properly index and tune the performance on these tables as our analyses are literally taking HOURS to complete - which of course become a problem on fields which are all set to some variation of varchar/nvarchar (max/4000/8000).

Tonight I am working with our network/IT staff member to rebuild the MASTER DB on the server in question. I have written the following code to resize the columns after a final re-collation. PLEASE evaluate and give me some feedback in case I have overlooked anything and will end up giving myself headaches fixing mistakes (we will of course take full backups of everything first).

We DON'T have to keep the server and DBs online for this process obviously, and can afford a certain amount of down time to complete.

SELECT  obj.name as Table_Name, clm.name as Column_Name
, case when clm.system_type_ID = 167 then 'varchar' else 'nvarchar' end as Column_Type
, cast(0 as int) as Column_Length
INTO    #tmp_Table_Column_Types
FROM    sys.objects as obj
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.columns as clm
ON      clm.object_id = obj.object_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats as dbp
ON      dbp.object_id = obj.object_id
WHERE   obj.type_desc in ('USER_TABLE')
AND     clm.system_type_ID in (167,231)
AND     dbp.Row_Count > 0

DECLARE @Table_Name nvarchar(500)
    ,   @Column_Name nvarchar(500)
    ,   @Column_Type varchar(8)
    ,   @Column_Length int
    ,   @SQL nvarchar(4000)

DECLARE TTCLU CURSOR FOR -- Temporary Table Column Length Update

SELECT Table_Name, Column_Name
FROM    #tmp_Table_Column_Types

OPEN ttclu

FETCH next FROM TTCLU INTO
@Table_Name, @Column_Name

WHILE @@Fetch_Status = 0

BEGIN

SET @SQL = '
UPDATE tmp SET Column_Length = sub.max_length
FROM  #tmp_Table_Column_Types AS tmp
LEFT OUTER JOIN (
SELECT  case when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 5 then 5
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 5 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 10 then 10
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 10 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 15 then 15
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 15 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 25 then 25
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 25 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 50 then 50
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 50 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 75 then 75
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 75 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 100 then 100
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 100 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 150 then 150
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 150 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 200 then 200
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 200 and max(len('+@Column_Name+')) <= 500 then 500
        when max(len('+@Column_Name+')) > 500 or max(len('+@Column_Name+')) is null then 1000
        end as Max_Length
FROM    '+@Table_Name+'
) AS sub
ON      ''A'' = ''A''
WHERE   tmp.Table_Name = '''+@Table_Name+'''
AND     tmp.Column_Name = '''+@Column_Name+'''
' print @sql execute sp_executesql @sql

FETCH next FROM TTCLU INTO
@Table_Name, @Column_Name

END

CLOSE TTCLU
DEALLOCATE TTCLU


DECLARE ATCT CURSOR FOR     -- Alter Table Column Type

SELECT *
FROM #tmp_Table_Column_Types

OPEN ATCT

FETCH next FROM ATCT INTO
@Table_Name, @Column_Name, @Column_Type, @Column_Length

WHILE @@Fetch_Status = 0

BEGIN

SET @SQL = '
ALTER TABLE '+@Table_Name+' ALTER COLUMN '+@Column_Name+' '+@Column_Type+' ('+cast(@Column_Length as nvarchar)+')
' print @sql execute sp_executesql @sql

FETCH next FROM ATCT INTO
@Table_Name, @Column_Name, @Column_Type, @Column_Length

END

CLOSE ATCT
DEALLOCATE ATCT

MAJOR EDIT: The code above is a good start to solve my problem: HOWEVER - Determining the maximum data length from the sys.columns IS NOT 100% accurate. To prove this, run the first two cursors as shown then

SELECT * FROM #tmp_Table_Column_Types ORDER BY Column_Length

You will see some column lengths listed as 0 (and probably several that are less than 10 characters which you may be pretty suspicious of).

If you do a select query on the indicated table and order by the len(field) you will see that indeed there IS data in the supposed 0 length columns.

I haven't found an elegant solution to this yet, however I instead use a sub-query to conduct an actual survey of the column data and return the length.

share|improve this question
    
This looks reasonable to me, and a quick test on my end generates valid SQL. You could make it a little more graceful by moving the round-up logic (e.g., 17 -> 25, 82 -> 100) into a UDF, but that's a quibble. –  Jon of All Trades Mar 15 '12 at 23:43
    
The only concern I have is that I don't see any mechanism to handle NVARCHARs or VARCHAR(MAX). –  Jon of All Trades Mar 15 '12 at 23:44
    
I believe that the behavior of "max" as a length variable in a (n)varchar field is as follows: If < 4k/8k Then len(data) else 4k/8k. In any case, I do not detect any columns in the .sys catalogs that have lengths outside of 0-8000k. And thank you for the feedback! –  Forrest Pugh Mar 16 '12 at 0:34

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