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I'm having a little bit of problem with my derived class. Basically I have a super class Object and a derived class UnmovableObject. I'm trying to add a boolean variable to the derive class, so that I can later on read it and see if my objects can be moved or not. The problem I have is that I'm storing all objects (super and derived) into a list<Object> inventory. Every time I read the values from the list, I get a weird value (204) for the isFixed() method. This is the code:

//super class
#pragma once
#include "stdafx.h"

class Object{
public:
    Object(); //constructor
    Object(const string name, const string description); //constructor
    ~Object(); //destructor
private:
    string nameOfObject; //the name of the room
    string objectDescription; //the description of the room
};

//derived class

#pragma once
#include "stdafx.h"
#include "object.h"

//This class creates unmovable objects - the user can't pick them up.
class UnmovableObject : public Object {
public:
    UnmovableObject(string name, string description);
    UnmovableObject(const Object &object)  : Object(object){};
    bool isFixed();
private:
    bool fixed;
};

//the constructor of this class takes a boolean value (by default true) - the object is fixed in this room
UnmovableObject::UnmovableObject(string name, string description) : Object(name, description){
    this->fixed = true;
}

//returns false as the object is not movable
bool UnmovableObject::isFixed(){
    return this->fixed;
}

//other class
list<Object> inventory;

How can I use inventory.push_back(Object/UnmovableObject); so that when I try to access the inventory I could get the correct boolean value for all of them—true for the UnmovableObject; false for the Object .

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are wanting to find out if any of the Objects are fixed, then you should really make isFixed() a member of the Object class. Then override it in the derived class. If you do it this way, you don't actually have to store the fixed variable. Also, you should change your vector to be a vector of pointers to Objects.

class Object
{
public:
    Object(); //constructor
    Object(const string name, const string description); //constructor
    ~Object(); //destructor
    virtual bool isFixed() {return false;}
private:
    string nameOfObject; //the name of the room
    string objectDescription; //the description of the room
};

class UnmovableObject : public Object {
public:
    UnmovableObject(string name, string description);
    UnmovableObject(const Object &object)  : Object(object){};
    virtual bool isFixed() {return true;}
};

vector<Object*> myVector;
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Hi. The virtual use of function did the trick quite nicely. Thank you –  Adrian Mar 16 '12 at 2:32

The first problem is called slicing. Wen you store into a list of Object only the Object subobject of the derived type is being copied. The list will only contain Object. If you need polymorphic behavior you need to use (smart) pointers in the container, so that the objects don't get copied (only the pointers).

The second problem is that you cannot hope to obtain the value of a member attribute that does not exist in your type. That is, since Object does not have a fixed member, you cannot obtain its value.

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Hi. So this means I have to modify all my code from storing and retrieving objects to pointers? Uffaa, that's going to take a while. I really hoped there was a trick to do it. Thank you –  Adrian Mar 16 '12 at 0:58
1  
No, there are certainly higher-level wrappers you can use to manage this indirection. In modern C++, you should seldom write *, rarely write new and almost never write delete. Check out boost::ptr_vector, for example. –  Karl Knechtel Mar 16 '12 at 1:18
1  
@Adrian or with only standard libraries you can use a list of shared_ptr or unique_ptr in C++11 (shared pointers are also in TR1. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 16 '12 at 1:35
    
@KarlKnechtel I keep hearing people say stuff like that---but I've yet to see much of an explanation of it. Are there questions on this site that adress it? Or can you point me to a book? –  Kazark Feb 4 '13 at 16:36
1  
@Kazark: Google/search in SO for smart pointers and their use. Basically using raw pointers is prone to errors and leaks (it is almost impossible to write exception safe code that uses dynamically allocations and does not use smart pointers). At the same time, if you pick the correct smart pointer to your needs, there will not be any performance impact. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 4 '13 at 17:02

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