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I don't know why but it keeps saying that prime?(num) method is not defined...
I am trying to make it so that it finds the product of prime numbers between 1 and 20

class LCM200        
  def prime?(num)
    if num == 1 then 
        return false
    end
    range = Math.sqrt(num)
    for i in 2..range           
        if num%i == 0
            return false
        end     
        return true
    end
  end
#if __FILE__ == $0
  lcm = 1
  for j in 1..20 do
    if prime?(j)
      lcm *= j
    end
  end       
  puts lcm
#end
end
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue is because you're running the code inside a class. Inside a class, prime? gets defined as an instance method of the class, however when you're running the for loop inside the class you're calling prime? as though it were a class method (aka static method). To fix it, just remove the class declarations:

def prime?(num)
    if num == 1 then 
        return false
    end

    range = Math.sqrt(num)
    for i in 2..range

        if num%i == 0
            return false
        end
    end

    # Note: moved return true to here since otherwise it would return
    # true after a single iteration
    return true
end

lcm = 1

for j in 1..20 do
    if prime?(j)
        lcm *= j
    end
end

puts lcm

You can also define prime? in a more "Ruby-ish" way:

def prime? num
  if num == 1
    false
  else
    (2..Math.sqrt(num)).all? { |i| i % num != 0 }
  end
end

Documentation for Enumerable#all?

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So in Ruby, is a method always an instance method when its defined inside a class? –  wayfare Mar 16 '12 at 1:20
    
also what difference does the question mark at the end of "all" method in this phrase (2..Math.sqrt(num)).all? { |i| i % num != 0 } –  wayfare Mar 16 '12 at 1:23
    
@wayfare: In Ruby, a method is always an instance method, period. Ruby has only one kind of method: instance methods. It doesn't have any other kind of method. In particular, it doesn't have class methods, and it certainly doesn't have static methods or constructors. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 16 '12 at 1:26
    
@wayfare: That's what the method is called. The name of the method is all?. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 16 '12 at 1:27
2  
@thinkswan: Those aren't class methods, those are instance methods of the class's singleton class. There are no class methods in Ruby. Only instance methods. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 16 '12 at 2:36

You don't need to define your own prime? function. As of Ruby 1.9, you can simply call the prime? function of the mathn library as follows:

  • require 'mathn'
  • 13.prime?

An example of this in action:

[Swanny ~]$ irb
irb(main):001:0> require 'mathn'
=> true
irb(main):002:0> 1.prime?
=> false
irb(main):003:0> 3.prime?
=> true
irb(main):004:0> 11.prime?
=> true
irb(main):005:0> 20.prime?
=> false
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