Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
String comparison in dotnet framework 4

I noticed a performance problem on my machine in a UI app that is doing lots of string comparisons to do filtering of large lists. I tracked the issue down to using OrdinalIgnoreCase in a call to string.IndexOf. The following benchmarks were run in Release without the debugger attached, it's a 4.0 project built in VS 2010, windows 7, I do have the 4.5 beta installed on this machine, I'm not sure if that would affect this.

1.190 seconds for OrdinalIgnoreCase
0.178 seconds for CurrentCultureIgnoreCase
0.175 seconds for InvariantCultureIgnoreCase

0.101 seconds for Ordinal
0.132 seconds for CurrentCulture
0.126 seconds for InvariantCulture

1.176 seconds for OrdinalIgnoreCase
0.189 seconds for CurrentCultureIgnoreCase
0.183 seconds for InvariantCultureIgnoreCase

0.104 seconds for Ordinal
0.138 seconds for CurrentCulture
0.127 seconds for InvariantCulture

As you can see OrdinalIgnoreCase is over 6.5x slower! But without IgnoreCase Ordinal is the fastest. In multiple places microsoft recommends OrdinalIgnoreCase for the best performance. Can anyone replicate these results or explain why OrdinalIgnoreCase is going so much slower in this test?

private static void Test(string search, string key, StringComparison comparison, int trials)
{
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

    for (int i = 0; i < trials; i++)
    {
        search.IndexOf(key, comparison);
    }

    Console.WriteLine("{0:0.000} seconds for {1}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds / 1000.0, comparison);
}


static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int trials = 1000000;
    var search = Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N");
    var key = "34";

    Test(search, key, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.Ordinal, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.CurrentCulture, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.InvariantCulture, trials);

    Test(search, key, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.Ordinal, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.CurrentCulture, trials);
    Test(search, key, StringComparison.InvariantCulture, trials);
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by BoltClock Apr 25 '12 at 15:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
I have no idea, but have you tried randomizing the test order to ensure that something else isn't causing the delay in your test fixture? –  Ritch Melton Mar 16 '12 at 1:39
    
Ok, just tried that. Not the problem. –  Ritch Melton Mar 16 '12 at 1:41
    
Using .NET 3.5, the benchmarks are relatively consistent. Targeting 4.0, I see the same as above. –  Adam S Mar 16 '12 at 2:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is apparently a known performance problem in .net 4, I found this bug entry on connect.microsoft.com

And there is a response

Posted by Microsoft on 2/10/2012 at 11:43 AM We were able to repro this issue. The issue has been resolved and the fix will be in the next release. Thank you for you feedback.

I'm not sure what the next release will be, I will just prefer using InvariantCultureIgnoreCase instead

share|improve this answer
1  
The next release will be .Net 4.5, that comes out with VS 11. But I have no idea when will that be or whether it will fix this bug. –  svick Mar 17 '12 at 2:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.