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I understand how to sort a data frame:

df[order(df$Height),]

and I understand how to filter (or subset) a data frame matching some predicate:

df[df$Weight > 120,]

but how do I sort and filter (as an example, order by Height and filter by Weight)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Either in two steps

 df1 <- df[df$weight > 120, ]
 df2 <- df1[order(df1$height), ]

or if you must in one step -- but it really is not any cleaner.

Data first:

R> set.seed(42)
R> df <- data.frame(weight=rnorm(10, 120, 10), height=rnorm(10, 160, 20))
R> df
   weight height
1   133.7  186.1
2   114.4  205.7
3   123.6  132.2
4   126.3  154.4
5   124.0  157.3
6   118.9  172.7
7   135.1  154.3
8   119.1  106.9
9   140.2  111.2
10  119.4  186.4

And one way of doing it is double-subsetting:

R> subset(df, weight > 120)[order(subset(df, weight > 120)$height),]
  weight height
9  140.2  111.2
3  123.6  132.2
7  135.1  154.3
4  126.3  154.4
5  124.0  157.3
1  133.7  186.1
R> 

I'd go with the two-step.

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Just out of curiosity, why set.seed(42)? –  kohske Mar 16 '12 at 3:48
    
I'd use reshape2::arrange(subset(df, weight > 120), height) –  baptiste Mar 16 '12 at 3:55
    
I was waiting for the appropriate Hadley-isms :-) –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Mar 16 '12 at 4:08
    
@kohske set.seed is used just so you can replicate the example with exactly the same outputs as Dirk Eddelbuettel got. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 16 '12 at 4:09
    
@DirkEddelbuettel @mrdwab Of course I know. I would say why 42, not 1 or 2. –  kohske Mar 16 '12 at 4:15

The package data.table allows you to this in one short line of code:

Borrowing Dirk Eddelbuettel's example, set up some data:

set.seed(42)
df <- data.frame(weight=rnorm(10, 120, 10), height=rnorm(10, 160, 20))

Convert the data.frame to a data.table and subset on weight, ordering by height:

library(data.table)
dt <- data.table(df)

dt[weight>120][order(height)]

       weight   height
[1,] 140.1842 111.1907
[2,] 123.6313 132.2228
[3,] 135.1152 154.3149
[4,] 126.3286 154.4242
[5,] 124.0427 157.3336
[6,] 133.7096 186.0974
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Nice. Yes this is one of the key convenience features of data.table. I wonder if new users think they have to convert all the time to use data.table, though? In this case, and many others, the call to data.frame() can be replaced by data.table() and there's no need to convert when starting with a data.table in the first place. I know you know this, it's just a marketing question really. –  Matt Dowle Mar 21 '12 at 10:09

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