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I have a piece of javascript code like this

        if(prog > 100)
          prog = 100;
        else if(prog <0)
          prog = 0;
        else if(typeof prog != 'number')
          prog = 0;

It looks bad and ugly. Is there some cooler way to write this in javascript?

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1  
It doesn't look ugly at all. That's how if statements look. –  Brian Willis Mar 16 '12 at 3:12
1  
Hey - isn't it the case taht be it any condition you only need 1 sels i.e. prog = 0 in both else if ; hence you dont need 2 else if and look at using ternary operation if its just one else it, hope this help, CHeers\ –  Tats_innit Mar 16 '12 at 3:14
    
What are you trying to do??? –  gdoron Mar 16 '12 at 3:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this:

 foo = typeof foo == "number" ? foo : 0;
 foo.constrain(0, 100);

Which would simply require this to be defined:

Number.prototype.constrain = function(min, max) {
  return Math.min(max, Math.max(min, this.valueOf())); 
}
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This is the best answer if you're doing this often... or create a utility object of some kind with the same kind of functionality. –  appclay Mar 16 '12 at 3:47
    
Thanks, it's a JS style code. –  Rocky Mar 16 '12 at 7:26
prog = Math.max(0, Math.min(100, typeof prog == 'number' ? prog : 0));
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Yeah, that's not ugly!!! –  gdoron Mar 16 '12 at 3:18
1  
Well the question talks about ugliness, and I figured, better give him some options as it's a bit subjective –  appclay Mar 16 '12 at 3:19
    
I'll upvote your comment, not the answer... –  gdoron Mar 16 '12 at 3:20
    
Also, my one might qualify in the "coolness" part of the question too... Again, quite subjective –  appclay Mar 16 '12 at 3:22

prog = (prog > 100 ? 100 : (prog<0 || (typeof prog != 'number') ? 0 : prog));

jsfiddle

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1  
That does not do what is required at all. The original if/else makes sure the number is between zero and one hundred, your ternary operation sets it to zero if it is less than one hundred. –  blankabout Mar 16 '12 at 3:19
1  
thanks, i didn't catch it. –  sbagdat Mar 16 '12 at 3:19
2  
in the original, if prog is say, 50, or any other number between 0 and 100, it will stay as is. –  appclay Mar 16 '12 at 3:21
    
ok, i edited this –  sbagdat Mar 16 '12 at 3:26
if(typeof prog != 'number' || prog < 0){
    prog = 0;
} else if (prog > 100) {
    prog = 100;
}
  • if prog is not a number, or less than 0, set to zero right off the bat
  • else if prog is greater than 100, set 100
  • anything else, it leaves it alone

the issue was you were evaluating a variable as a number without knowing that it's a number (since you placed the typeof check last). if i were to pass foo to prog, you'd be evaluating 2 times before checking the type. also, you were evaluating two conditions for the same output of 0, better merge them.

JS does not evaluate the OR further when it sees a TRUE in the condition. likewise can be said for the AND when it sees a FALSE.

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Really you should test the type first:

if ( typeof prog != 'number' || prog < 0 )
   prog = 0;
else if( prog > 100 )
   prog = 100;

Double ternary:

prog = typeof prog != 'number'?0:prog;
prog = (prog>100)?100:((prog<0)?0:prog);
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Here is my take. It is functionally equivalent, and concise, but not the legible when you come back to the code 12 months from now.

prog = (typeof prog != 'number' || prog < 0 ? 0 : (prog > 100 ? 100 : prog));

UPDATE

Here are a couple other ways to do this.

prog = (typeof prog != 'number' ? 0 : Math.max(0,Math.min(prog, 100)));
prog = (typeof prog != 'number' || prog < 0 ? 0 : Math.min(prog, 100));

I think the first of these two is probably the easiest to understand. Basically, if it isn't a number it sets it to 0, else it makes sure it is between 0 and 100 which seems to be the logic you are really going after.

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The original doesn't change prog if it is between 0 and 100 –  appclay Mar 16 '12 at 3:45
    
Ah, I didn't catch that. I updated my example. It works, but personally I probably wouldn't do it this way. It is pretty hard to read. –  pseudosavant Mar 16 '12 at 20:16
    
I realized a couple of better ways to do it that are much more legible and convey the intended logic better. –  pseudosavant Mar 16 '12 at 20:21

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