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In JLS(Java Language Specification): The notion of subsignature is designed to express a relationship between two methods whose signatures are not identical, but in which one may override the other. Specifically, it allows a method whose signature does not use generic types to override any generified version of that method.

interface CollectionConverter<U> {
    <T> List<T> toList(Collection<T> c);

    void fooMethod(Class<?> c);

    <E>Comparable<E> method3(E e);

    Comparable<U> method4(U u);
}

class Overrider implements CollectionConverter<Integer> {
    @Override
    public List toList(Collection c) {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public void fooMethod(Class c) {

    }

    @Override
    public  Comparable method3(Object o) {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    // compile error, have to change Object to Integer 
    public Comparable method4(Object u) {                       

        return null;
    }
}

According to JLS, I understand why the first 3 methods work well, but I can't figure it out why method4 has a compile error which says The method method4(Object) of type Overrider must override or implement a supertype method.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The signature of method4 in CollectionConverter is

Comparable<U> method4(U u);

You declare Overrider to implement CollectionConverter<Integer>, thereby binding the type parameter U to Integer. The signature then becomes:

Comparable<Integer> method4(Integer u);

You can declare a method4(Object u) in Overrider, but that method signature does not override method4(Integer u) specified in the interface any more than it would if you weren't using generics at all.

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However, after type erasure, all the type parameters replaced by Object or the first bound in the "extends" list. Just like the first three methods, after erasure the first three methods' signatures are exactly the same as the ones in Overrider class. Following this lead, the signature and return type of method4 should be: Comparable method4(Object u) which is the same as the one in Overrider. So, this is my question –  Yan Yan Mar 18 '12 at 21:09
    
@RobyYan - Generics are not just syntactic sugar for down-casting from the least upper bound. Type erasure kicks in after the compiler checks for type safety. The whole idea of generics is to enable the compiler to do type checking for you. Forcing the compiler to do its analysis as if type erasure had already been applied would be hopeless; there'd be almost nothing left for it to work with. –  Ted Hopp Mar 18 '12 at 21:50
    
"The whole idea of generics is to enable the compiler to do type checking for you. Forcing the compiler to do its analysis as if type erasure had already been applied would be hopeless; there'd be almost nothing left for it to work with." Got it, I almost forget the original purpose of generics, thanks for your answer –  Yan Yan Mar 19 '12 at 16:51
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The problem is the type variable U is bound to Integer at that point. If you change the declaration to

public Comparable method4(Integer u) ...

it is an override

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Because in the interface, method4 is declared with the same type parameter as the interface (U). If you change it to something else, it should work.

For example

<A> Comparable<A> method4(A a);
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