Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

the python keyword is is supposed to be used in place of the == operator according to python style guides.

However they don't always do exactly the same thing as shown here. Why? What is the actual difference, and what is the proper usage?

import unittest

class testIS(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_is(self):
        self.assertEqual(1,1)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Which works... but the following does not...

import unittest

class testIS(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_is(self):
        self.assertEqual(1,1)

if __name__ is '__main__':
    unittest.main()
share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of String comparison in Python: is vs. == –  Mat Mar 16 '12 at 7:11
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

is will return True if two variables point to the same object, == if the objects referred to by the variables are equal.

>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> b = a
>>> b is a 
True
>>> b == a
True
>>> b = a[:]
>>> b is a
False
>>> b == a
True
share|improve this answer
    
Marked best answer for providing a quick example :) –  jazzvibes Mar 17 '12 at 0:42
if money_in_wallet is money_that_was_in_wallet(two_weeks_ago):
    print("I still live with my parents and have no income or expenses")
elif money_in_wallet == money_that_was_in_wallet(two_weeks_ago):
    print("Good, my budget is exactly balanced")
share|improve this answer
    
Haha, perfect :-) –  Tony Blundell Mar 16 '12 at 12:56
    
That's hilarious! –  jazzvibes Mar 17 '12 at 0:41

is tests if both inputs are actually the same object. That is located the same address in memory.

== calls the __eq__ method on one of the input objects. Objects can then define their own __eq__ method and decide what is equal and what is not.

share|improve this answer

The Python keyword 'is' checks for object identity, while == operator checks for equality of values. For example:

>>> if Car1 is Car2:
>>>     [do something...]

this code tests if Car1 and Car2 refer to the same car, while

>>> if Car1 == Car2:
>>>     [do something...]

checks if Car1 and Car2 are of same quality, that is if they are of the same model, color, etc.

For this reason, __name__ is "__main__" returns False, because the string "__main__" and the value stored in __name__ are really two different string objects. So to check if the value of __name__ string is equal to __main__, use == operator.

share|improve this answer

Check out...

http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#not-in

... Which states...

The operators is and is not test for object identity: x is y is true if and only if x and y are the same object

share|improve this answer

== tests for equality. Two non-identical objects can be equal.

is tests for identity, i.e. whether both refer to the same one object.

share|improve this answer
    
Better is to say == tests for value while is tests for identity. –  nightcracker Mar 16 '12 at 7:23
1  
@nightcracker: no, the use of the ambiguous term equality is actually acurate, since the definition of equality is defined by the type of the objects. Unless you override __eq__ in user-defined classes, == checks for identity, not value. –  André Caron Mar 16 '12 at 7:34
    
@André Caron: what the default implementation is, is a guess, where identity happens to be a pretty good guess in Python. But it by no means changes it's semantic meaning, which is test for equality by value. –  nightcracker Mar 16 '12 at 7:37
1  
@nightcracker 'value' is a subtle term. I can define that objects of a type are equal with probability 0.5 regardless of their value, for example. Or I can have a temporary object 'ignorecase(str)' which can do nothing but be compared for equality with a string. Discussing what value do these objects have seems meaningless for me, yet testing for equality can make sense. –  hamstergene Mar 16 '12 at 7:39
    
@nightcracker: The class can make __eq__ mean whatever makes sense with respect to the abstraction, including equality by identity. This doesn't have to be equality by value. –  André Caron Mar 16 '12 at 7:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.